Black Boy Review Of Richard Wrights Novel

3595 words - 14 pages

Black BoyI. SummaryBlack Boy by Richard Wright is an autobiographical look at his life. It covers his life from the age of 4 years to his mid 20's. The book shows the life of a young black man growing up in the south with Jim Crow laws and the general hate for blacks by whites. After realizing that the color of his skin limited his opportunities in the south he dreamed of moving north for a different life. Eventually he moved north to Chicago, but only saw little difference in racial equality. In Chicago he began associating with the communist party: because of their fair treatment of blacks. Black Boy illustrates the plight of black America and how Wright dealt with it through education and reading. In his quest for knowledge, Wright stirred up animosity among both blacks and whites.William Wright was born September 4,1908 on a farm in Mississippi. He was the oldest of two, his brother Alan was a year younger. Wright had a rough childhood; plagued by poverty, abandonments, and constant beatings by family members. Through all of his hardships Wright never lost sight of what was important, his education and his self-esteem.At a very early age Richard has to deal with some extremely tough issues. At the mere age of five, Richards father left him and the family behind for another woman. This financially ruined his family even worse. His mother had to get a job to feed them. His father offered no financial support nor did a court order him to. Because his mother could not earn enough money to buy food, Wright went out to find work to help; foregoing an education. At age 8 his mother suffered a stroke which paralyzed her, this made her unable to work. She required constant medical attention. Wright, his mother and brother moved to his grandparents house. Wright spent most of his childhood living at his grandmothers. He is treated very poorly by his grandmother and his aunt Addie. They are constantly beating him for no apparent reason. These beatings go on for a long time, but he fights back several times against his grandmother, aunts, and uncles. Wright had a great deal of independence and self-reliance, probably gained by the abandonments suffered as a young man. Another source of turmoil in Wrights life while living in his grandmothers house was a matter of religion. His grand mother went to church all the time and was constantly quoting the bible, but Wright did not believe in God or the church. His grandmother hated him for thisRace relations did not affect Wright through out his early childhood. He did not even realize there was a difference in color until his early teens. A black in the early 1900's was supposed to act a certain way in front of whites: like they were sub-human. It took Wright a long time to learn that. He would act like anyone else not recognizing whites as superior just equals. He almost got killed because of it. One day, when Wright was a teenager, a group of white men offered Wright a ride he said'sure'. Half to town they...

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