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Blade Runner And Frankenstein Essay

1724 words - 7 pages

Bound by different contexts, authors often use a popular medium in order to depict the discontent of the ideas of society. This is evident in the module Texts in Time; as Blade Runner, having been written more than one hundred years after Frankenstein is still able to reflect the ideas proposed in the latter. Blade Runner by Ridley Scott deals with the effects of globalisation and consumerism during 1980’s. Alternatively, the epistolary novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley deals with the kinship to the natural world set in the Romantic Era and enlightenment period. However Blade Runner, although subjected by a different context, also portrays a similar idea to Frankenstein; the fear of ...view middle of the document...

Scott depicts these features of the film in this way as he attempts to truly demonstrate the power, dominance and even danger that globalisation and consumerism can have in the future. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, although not about the dangers of globalisation and consumerism in the future, also addresses a certain danger that can arise from an increasingly powerful aspect of the world, science and technology. Scott portrays these dangers in an albeit similar way to Shelley, although displaying different values. Through this similarity we are able to effectively understand Shelley’s purpose as the dangers that she expresses in Frankenstein are more clearly expressed through a familiar context in Blade Runner.

Globalisation and consumerism, both extremely significant aspects arising from the industrial revolution, also arose from another increasingly power aspect of the world. Science and Technology allowed for industrialisation to truly grow through its advancements and benefits it poses towards industries. Industries were able to strive off these advancements, allowing them to produce more and effectively take control of the decade. Scott addresses this idea in his film as well as coupling it with another forefront value of the film, the definition of a human. Throughout the film, the constant motif of what it is to be a human is displayed through both human and replicant. Scott is suggesting that the advancements of science and technology have indeed gone as far as to not know the difference, initially, between a human and a replicant, this is displayed during Rachael’s voight-kampff test scene. After conducting the test, and cognisant of the fact that Rachael is a replicant, Deckard and Tyrell discuss why it took so long for the test to identify her as a replicant. “ Deckard- ‘She doesn’t know’ Tyrell- ‘She’s beginning to suspect I think’ Deckard - ‘Suspect? How does it not know what it is?’ ”. Deckard is not just baffled by the fact that she doesn’t know she’s a replicant, but more of the fact that science and technology has advanced that far that it becomes extremely difficult to truly know what is the difference between humans and replicants. However, during the penultimate scene of the film, the replicant Roy Batty comes to terms with his fate and as a result essentially discovers the definition. Roy states “I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe...all these moments will be lost in time like tears in rain...time to die.” Coupled with the dove flying into the first clear sky of the film, symbolising peace in the storm, Batty finds a sense of peace with him being a replicant and at this stage he becomes more human than ever. Although this peace is calming in the film, it still addresses the fear of the advancement of science and technology. Like Frankenstein, Tyrell effectively created not only a replicant, but a human being. However, since Scott has placed this idea in a relevant medium to the current audience, we are able to...

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