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Book Analysis Of A Clockwork Orange

741 words - 3 pages

Book Analysis of A Clockwork Orange

The violent main character of this story, Alex, goes on a moral journey. It is written as a personal recounting of events in a very straight-to-the-point manner. Alex seems to describe things very well, but without emotion. He starts off drinking milk laced with drugs in a milk bar with his three “droogs”. The fashion of the time is for adolescents to do whatever they want, as careless adults are usually the victims of this “ultra-violence”. After a night of peddling “cancers and dengs”, mugging, gang-fighting with Billybob’s group, and raping a woman, the boys head back to the Korova milk bar. Dim insults Alex’s beloved classical music, which ...view middle of the document...

Alex manages to navigate through the snow to a small house, and is taken in by F. Alexander. Alexander wants to use Alex’s circumstance to build a case against the state to help Alex. Alexander eventually realizes that Alex is the boy that raped and (unintentionally) killed his wife two years ago after he speaks in nadsat slang. Alex is subjected to classical music and locked in an apartment as an attempt by Alexander to force Alex’s suicide. Alex leaps from a window, but doesn’t die. After a couple weeks, he wakes up to the Ludivo Effect removed from his body, F. Alexander is locked up, and there is a job set up for him. Alex goes back to his old life of crime, only with new droogs, but he quickly tires of that way of living and doesn’t wish to do it anymore. Alex runs into Pete, who has settled down with a wife and son, which tempts Alex into doing the same thing.
This book frequently presents violence and morality. The mind’s civility is pitted against the mind’s savagery as Alex commits his...

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