Book Reiew Essay

754 words - 4 pages

I was ready and prepared to hate this book, it seemed to hold no attraction, all the warning signs were there: it’s a bestseller, narrated by a five year old boy while dealing with serious and harrowing subject matter, a showy experiment? I feel I would have disliked it had Emma Donoghue not pulled off something quite miraculous; achieving a young voice free of precociousness without allowing the book to slip into something too simple. There was far more to it than I had anticipated.
Inspired by the Joseph Fritzl case, Room tells the story of the imprisonment of Jack and his Ma in a 12 foot square soundproofed shed in the backyard of her abductor ‘Old Nick’. We meet them both on Jacks fifth birthday, his mother was kidnapped two years before Jack was born, at the age of nineteen. They have daily visits from their captor, who brings meagre supplies; the only luxuries are a TV set and half a dozen books. Jack, whose own reality exists entirely within the four walls, believes that everything he sees in their television screen is ‘pretend’. The entire first half takes place in Room, yes, Room with a capital letter and no article (a or the) each thing inside Room is personified, a substitute for genuine company.
Ma emerges as a heroic character, trying to raise her son under the most horrific circumstances. The rituals and routines she has established to keep Jack engaged and mentally stimulated are truly remarkable, for five years, it seems she has devoted every scrap of energy to the development of her son. In a way, Jacks narration is a testament to these efforts, he believes everything is okay and feels safe, even the arrival of ‘Old Nick’ is seen as a benign event through his eyes. This is of course in part down to the limit of Jacks understanding and comprehension, but also because of the positive upbringing he has had.
For me, the novel took its sinister turn when the plans of escape were starting to be discussed and shared. You are reminded at different points throughout the first half exactly how terrifying the situation is, but before any talk of escape Jack remains blind to the...

Find Another Essay On Book Reiew

charant Creon as the Main Character of Antigone

1231 words - 5 pages Creon as the Main Character of Antigone   Throughout the Greek play Antigone by Sophocles, there exists a dispute as to who should receive the designation of main character. Antigone, the daughter of the cursed King Oedipus, as well as Creon, stately king of Thebes, both appear as the key figures in this historic play. I believe that Creon, king of Thebes, should be considered the main character in this work of Greek theater. Three

Free Macbeth Essays: Sleep and Sleeplessness

525 words - 2 pages The Sleep and Sleeplessness Motif in Macbeth We have consciences that function to tell us the difference between right and wrong. If we have clear consciences, we usually possess the ability to sleep. But when our consciences are full of guilt, we experience a state of sleeplessness. In Macbeth, Shakespeare uses the sleep and sleeplessness motif to represent Macbeth's and Lady Macbeth's consciences and the effect Macbeth's conscience has on

Life Outside of Life in Hawthorne’s Wakefield

898 words - 4 pages Life Outside of Life in Hawthorne’s Wakefield   Efficacy lies at the heart of human desires for immortality. Characters throughout literature and art are depicted as wanting to step aside and see what their world would be like without their individual contributions. The literary classic A Christmas Carol and the more recent, but ageless, film It’s Wonderful Life both use outside influences (three ghosts and Clarence the Angel

Essay on Identity in Song of Solomon

2172 words - 9 pages Searching for Identity in Song of Solomon         Abstract: Whether Africans really fly or just escape a monumental burden, perhaps only through death, is a decision Toni Morrison has apparently left to her readers. Never the less, no matter what you believe, within Song of Solomon, the suggestion is, that in order to "fly" you must go back to the beginning, back to your roots. You must learn the "art" from the old messages.   O

The Character of Oedipus in Oedipus and The Infernal Machine

904 words - 4 pages The Character of Oedipus in Oedipus and The Infernal Machine    The stories of Oedipus, as told through Seneca's Oedipus and Cocteau's The Infernal Machine, contain both similarites and differences. Both authors portray the character of Oedipus as being obstinate, ignorant, and inquisitive. Yet Seneca and Cocteau differ on their interpretation of the motives that propelled these characteristics of Oedipus. Seneca portrays Oedipus as a

Okonkwo's Tragic Flaws in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

3121 words - 12 pages is assured of Okonkwo's physical strength and reputation from the very introduction of Things Fall Apart. The book actually opens "Okonkwo was well known throughout the nine villages and even beyond" (Achebe 3). His celebrity was based firmly in his "solid personal achievements" as a great local wrestler. Achebe describes Okonkwo's physical attributes: "He was tall and huge, and his bushy eyebrows and wide nose gave him a very severe look. He

Sophocles' Antigone - Antigone Must Challenge Creon

889 words - 4 pages Antigone Must Challenge Creon in Antigone   In his "Funeral Oration" Pericles, Athens's leader in their war with other city-states, rallies the patriotism of his people by reminding them of the things they value. He encourages a sense of duty to Athens even to the point of self-sacrifice. He glorifies the free and democratic Athenian way of life and extravagantly praises those willing to die for it. In Antigone, Creon, Thebes's leader in

The Role of Women in Homer’s Iliad

796 words - 3 pages as far as to support him fully, although the attentive reader can sense that doing so is immensely painful for her. Therefore, although it superficially seems that Thetis supports war and aggression, her true motives are far more admirable. Unlike Thetis, Andromache’s values are clear. On the rampart in book six, she makes an impassioned plea to Hector for reason and peace. "Pity me, please!" she says, "Take your stand on the rampart here

A Comparison of Butler's Life and Kindred

1915 words - 8 pages : Greenwood Press, 1997. Gates, Jr., Henry Louis, and Dorothy Allison. Reading Black, Reading Feminist: A Critical Anthology. Ed. Henry Louis Gates. New York: Meridian Book, 1990. Jackson, Jerome H. "Sci-fi Tales from Octavia E. Butler." The Crisis 101.3(1994): 4-5,10. Smith, Jessie Carney, Ed. Notable Black American Women. Detroit: Gale Research, 1992. Stevenson, Rosemary. Black Women in America: an Historical Encyclopedia

Pillars of Metaphorical Ambiguity in The Scarlet Letter

1439 words - 6 pages who is abandoned by her older, disfigured husband, and falls in love with a young, passionately God-fearing man who subsequently conceives a child, thus revealing her "adultery" and is punished by the Puritan society that he represents.  She is instructed to wear a red letter, hence the title of the book.  Through her punishment, she acquires and applies several motifs that the novel boasts, the most powerful one being represented perpetually

An Analysis of Robert Ji-Song Ku's Leda

2003 words - 8 pages ] life (or [his] reality) is just another book, a work of literature" (281). He justifies or explains this by saying "it was simply important to me that the choices I made in my life (or 'in my book') contained multiple levels of referentiality to 'other' works of literature, whether directly or indirectly, for better or worse" (Wong 281). As a result of this need for "multiple levels" (physical, emotional, mental) from other works and the need to be

Similar Essays

Reality And Illusion In Shakespeare's Hamlet Reality, Appearance And Deception

896 words - 4 pages Reality and Illusion in Hamlet   Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet, begins with the appearance of a ghost, an apparition, possibly a hallucination. Thus, from the beginning, Shakespeare presents the air of uncertainty, of the unnatural, which drives the action of the play and develops in the protagonist as a struggle to clarify what only seems to be absolute and what is actually reality. Hamlet's mind, therefore, becomes the central force of the

Sub Plots In Hamlet Essay

1118 words - 4 pages Sub-plots in Hamlet   There are many things that critics say make Hamlet a "Great Work," one of which is the way that Shakespeare masterfully incorporates so many sub-plots into the story, and ties them all into the main plot of Hamlet’s revenge of his father’s murder. By the end of Act I, not only is the main plot identified, but many other sub-plots are introduced. Among the sub-plots are trust in the Ghost of King Hamlet, Fortinbras, and

Hamlet As Victim And Hero Essay

1301 words - 5 pages Hamlet as Victim and Hero      Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, a Shakespearean tragedy, tells the story of Prince Hamlet, who gained the knowledge of a terrible incident that his kingdom had suffered. Claudius, the king of Denmark and Hamlet's uncle, had killed his own brother, the king, who was also the father of Hamlet, and married his brother's widow. Hamlet suffered these traumas to a severe degree, and his only relief was to defeat his

Essay On Light And Dark In Antigone

1188 words - 5 pages Use of Light and Dark in Antigone   The "Golden Age" of Greece is noted for its many contributions to the creative world, especially in its development of the play. These performances strived to emphasize Greek morals, and were produced principally for this purpose. Antigone, by Sophocles, is typical. The moral focused on in Antigone is the conflict between physis (nature) and nomos (law), with physis ultimately presiding over nomos