Book Report To The Class On A Handmaid's Tale By Margaret Atwood. May Want To Add More About The Themes And Take Out Some Of The Plot Description.

1071 words - 4 pages ✓ Expert Reviewed

Margaret Atwood, born in Ontario in 1939, has written several books, not just The Handmaid's Tale. Her most acclaimed novels were The Edible Women, which was her first novel, and was published in 1969 to wide acclaim, and The Blind Assassin, which won Great Britain's Booker Prize for Literature in the year 2000. However, her most widely known book is The Handmaid's Tale, which was published in 1986 and quickly became a best seller. It is now a staple of high school and college reading lists.

The Handmaid's Tale is set in the near future in the fictional Republic of Gilead, which is started after "they shot the [US] president and machine gunned the Congress and the army declared a state of emergency." Immediately after this catastrophe the Constitution was suspended, newspapers were censored or shut down, and roadblocks appeared. Soon, all women lost their jobs, their bank accounts were frozen, and they found themselves forced into what was called service, but what was practically slavery.

(Read page describing how she felt and about the "other" army)

The setting, or the Republic of Gilead, is very important in showing how and why things happened the way that they did, and why Offred, the main character, behaves, thinks, and acts the way that she does.

The Handmaid's Tale covers Offred's time with her Commander, which was less than a year. However, throughout the story, Offred has several flashbacks that reveal what happened to her in her past.

Offred was a married woman with a young daughter when the Republic of Gilead came into being. Since her husband had been divorced before marrying her, her marriage was considered void. She and her husband tried to escape into Canada, but they were caught. Her husband and child were taken away from her, and she was shipped off to a training base, where Aunts, or older teachers, taught her what her new position was to be. Since Offred was young and still able to bear children, she was given a choice: either become a "Rachel", whose basic purpose was to have a child to be raised a Commander's house, or be declared an "Unwoman" and be sent to the colonies, where "eventually, your nose falls off and your skin pulls away like rubber gloves." Naturally, she chose to become a Handmaid. After being trained (and meeting up with her old college friend, Moira), Offred is assigned to her Commander's house. Her Commander's wife, Serena Joy, is a bitter woman who wants nothing to do with her. Everyday, Offred goes into the town to shop with another Rachel. Her shopping partner, Ofglen, is a...

Find Another Essay On Book Report to the Class on A HANDMAID'S TALE by Margaret Atwood. May want to add more about the themes and take out some of the plot description.

Vision of Feminism in the Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

1222 words - 5 pages Feminism in the novel The Handmaid’s Tale written by Margaret Atwood is a prominent theme. This novel represents the morals and horrors of a vision of feminism, which is sometimes taken to the extremes. Women’s rights have been downgraded and as a result of this women are used to bear children and are constantly watched by the eye. The Handmaids are considered powerful figures in the novels’ society while living in a dystopia of cultural...

Group Analysis of the Imagery, Symbolism, Figurative Language, Ironic Devices and more for "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood.

2709 words - 11 pages Imagery: Throughout the novel, "The Handmaid's Tale", Margaret Atwood presents an astonishing amount of vivid imagery and description that makes up the style and flow of the novel. Perhaps the first images present in the novel are that of light and dark. Listed in the table of contents, the reader can see that nearly every other...

The Hope and Hopelessness of Moira: "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood: Argumentative essay: Moira as a symbolic character of hope to the main character.

768 words - 3 pages ="THE HANDMAID'S TALE">The Handmaid's Tale", through the minor character of Moira. This character is referred to throughout the novel as strong-willed and independent until Offred finds her near the end, different and broken. Through Moira, Atwood is able to develop Offred as a dependent on hope and further develop the theme of hopelessness in Totalitarian governments.Throughout the novel, Offred makes references to Moira, Offreds...

The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood Discuss the Gileadean concept of "Freedom to, freedom from"

1318 words - 5 pages reached a peak where it is bordering on spiralling out of control. The society that has implemented the fundamentalist approach of 'freedom from' is the Republic of Gilead, where the limitations on...

The theme of power and control as demonstrated through The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

2232 words - 9 pages It is necessary for the government to impose a certain amount of power and control on its citizens in order for a society to function properly. However, too much power and control in a society eliminates the freedom of the residents, forbidding them to live an ordinary life. In the dystopic futuristic novel, The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret...

The Handmaid's Tale: A Reflection of the Past and Warnings for Future Generations Author: Margaret Atwood

6272 words - 25 pages . Infertility and a decreasing population are indeed issues occurring in present life, in different countries of course, but, it is also becoming a trend which can lead to problems too. With research done, Atwood suggests that this is something the world must watch for, be prepared, for nobody will know what kind of theocracy can take over and apply these same methods to the current world.Work Cited:Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Canada...

Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

932 words - 4 pages individual identity, a theme present throughout the novel. Still others like smell or hunger convey the atmosphere&emdash;both physical and psychological&emdash;in Gilead. Whatever their different purposes may be, the symbolic devices achieve the same result: they enlighten the reader on dangerous social tendencies and compel him/her to take action in order to prevent the outcomes they depict. Works Cited Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Anchor Books: New York, New York, 1985. ...

Heros in Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood.

961 words - 4 pages will focus on two, Gilgamesh from Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred from The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. At first glance, Gilgamesh is the embodiment of a bad ruler. He is all knowing, prideful, tyrannical, and cruel. For example, it is stated, "Gilgamesh, the strongest one of all, the perfect, the terror (4)." The people of Uruk criticize of his domination to the gods and the gods react by constructing Enkidu to...

The Presentation of the Commander in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

793 words - 3 pages The Presentation of the Commander in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood The commander can be seen as a man torn between two worlds, he was one of the founders of Gilead yet still enjoys and yearns for the pleasures of the old society he managed to break. It can be seen as ' he has made his bed and now he must sleep in it'. The commander is cool and collected on the surface but underneath he is bitter and corrupted...

How are the main characters in "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood constructed to represent the text's underlying values and attitudes?

1514 words - 6 pages represent. The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is one such text that utilises characterisation in order to convey the underlying attitudes and values presented. The Handmaid's Tale depicts the western democratic society of America, overthrown by a totalitarian society known as Gilead. The focus Atwood constructs is on the demise of western democratic ideals, such as freedom; implying that...

An Argument on whether or not The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood should be banned- Pro Dystopia

2835 words - 11 pages Pro Dystopia"I want everything back, the way it was. But there is no point to it, this wanting" (122). This is the desire of Margaret Atwood's central character Offred in The Handmaid's Tale. The novel is set in the near future in the Republic of Gilead which is formally the United States of America. Placing the blame on Islamic fanatics, a right-wing extremist movement guns down the president along with the congress, and takes total...

Similar Essays

"The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood.

1528 words - 6 pages shows us our world in a different and more critical light and shocks us with what we see. It shows us the truth, makes us realise, pulls back the layers of cotton wool and forces us to look at the world as it really is, how it may come to be and the evils and problems within it.The Handmaid's Tale, being science fiction, is based around the future of our society today. Margaret Atwood is predicting what our world will...

"The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood.

1764 words - 7 pages centralized, naturally unstable, and prone to making people want to rebel. When people start to resist the state this leads to paranoia by the rulers who then impose more restrictions which makes the people madder at the government. The system of capitalism we have in North America is more stable. The current system in America today is based on competition and there is a lot of variety. If one corporation is can't compete, it goes out of business. If...

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

623 words - 2 pages occur. We must then recognize the problems that Atwood was trying to point out. The relationship between Gilead and our society is the fact that gender does play a major factor on the way we are expected to behave. Not drastically, such as in the novel but enough to coerce us to conduct ourselves distinctively and play the assigned role of our gender. ...

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

661 words - 3 pages In The Handmaid’s Tale, much use is made of imagery; to enable the reader to create a more detailed mental picture of the novel’s action and also to intensify the emotive language used. In particular, Atwood uses many images involving flowers and plants. The main symbolic image that the flowers provide is that of life; in the first chapter of the novel Offred says “…flowers: these are not to be dismissed. I am alive.” Many of the flowers...