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Book Review: The Kite Runner

1229 words - 5 pages

The Kite Runner written by Khaled Hosseini is about a man named Amir who lives in modern San Francisco. He tells the story of him growing up in Afghanistan, and the events that follow him after a incident he witnessed in his childhood 26 years earlier. The story begins with him telling the readers that when he was a boy, he lived with his father, Baba, in Kabul, Afghanistan, along with Ali, the Hazara housekeeper, and his son and Amir’s “friend” Hassan. Amir lived a sad life of always trying to get his father’s attention, and that resulted with him betraying Hassan one winter day. After that day, things began to change, Amir, who was suffering from guilt, that forced Hassan and Ali to leave the house. A couple of years later, Amir and Baba had to escape Afghanistan due to a military invasion that was taking place there, they travel and migrate to Fremont, California. As the years went by, Amir graduated with a degree in English, and was living peacefully with Baba. He soon found a wife, Soraya, who he met at a local flea market. They marry and move into the apartment where Amir and Baba was living in. As the months go by, Baba becomes very sick, he soon dies, but before he does, he tells Amir as he was crying, that he was trying to raise Amir to be able to be independent from him. After that, Amir and Soraya move to San Francisco, where Amir receives a phone call from Rahim Khan. Rahim Khan is an old friend of Baba and used to come over to their house all the time in Kabul. He tells Amir about what happened to Afghanistan after he left, and that there was a way to be good again. With much thought, Amir decides that it was time to return to Afghanistan to redeem himself for running away from Hassan when he was in trouble that one winter day many years ago.
The theme of searching for redemption makes up most of the novel. Amir first started to search for redemption for himself when he was trying to make Baba acknowledge him as he was a child. He thought Baba was always mad at him because he was the cause of his mother death when she was giving birth to him. So Amir spent most of his life trying to please Baba. Some example would include him winning the kite-fighting tournament, and letting Hassan get rape so he can keep the blue kite that he cut and show it off to Baba. Another example is when Amir returned to Kabul to find Hassan’s son, Sohrab, and take him home to America to live with him and Soraya, after he learns that Hassan is his half-brother who passed away months ago. This also helps Amir to try to make up leaving Hassan alone during the kite-fighting tournament and forcing him to leave the house they once lived in together. One other theme is the love and difficult relationship between fathers and sons. Throughout the novel, there are multiple examples of this theme. Such as when Amir tries to make Baba acknowledge him, and every time, it seems as if Amir’s attempts were ignored. The main reason Baba did this though was because he...

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