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Bosnian Genocide Failure Of The West?

1430 words - 6 pages

The Bosnian genocide in 1992-95 is a prime example of the apathy that man can show toward the suffering of his fellow man. Even though it was widely considered to be “the worst act of genocide since the Nazi regime’s destruction of some 6 million European Jews during World War II,” (History.com) the world offered little help. While the U.N. sent peacekeepers to offer humanitarian aid and create “safe zones”, this did little to stem the tide of atrocities inflicted by the serbs upon Muslims in Bosnia. Although NATO forces finally joined the fight and the U.S. sponsored the Dayton Peace Pact in 1995, which finally ended hostilities, the failure to intervene soon enough to stop the mass killing of over 100,000 innocent civilians has been called, “the greatest failure of the West since the 1930s." (thehistoryplace.com).
After World war I, the western allies created Yugoslavia out of historic enemies including Croatia, Serbia, and Albania. Later, during World War II, Yugoslavia was invaded by Nazi Germany. During this occupation, Josip Broz Tito united conflicted Yugoslavia, thus combining Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, and the independent provinces of Kosovo and Vojvodina. Tito was a communist, and a strong leader who, “maintained ties with the Soviet Union and the United States during the Cold War, playing one superpower against the other while obtaining financial assistance and other aid from both,” (thehistoryplace.com). When Josip Tito died in 1980, Nationalism grew and spread through the Yugoslavian republics, and without Tito’s strong leadership, Yugoslavia quickly fell into political and economic turmoil.
The Bosnian Genocide had it’s beginnings in the late 1980’s when Slobodan Milosevic, “a former Communist who had turned to nationalism and religious hatred...,” (historyplace.com) gained power. Soon after, he began to exploit the long standing rivalries between the Orthodox Christian Serbian Minority and Albanian Muslim community in the independent province of Kosovo, to solidify his influence . Civil unrest eventually led to the loss of Kosovo’s independence, and it was eventually conquered by Milosevic’s forces.
In June of 1991, Slovenia and Croatia Chose to secede from Yugoslavia, resulting in a Civil war in which Yugoslavian forces, now made of Serbians under Milosevic’s orders, fought the Slovenian separatists. After losing interest in slovenia due to the low number of Slavs to recruit to his aims, he turned his attention to Croatia, where Orthodox Serbians made up twelve percent of the population, and invaded in July, ‘91 on the premise of “protecting” the Serbian minority. when his forces attacked the city of Vukovar, bombarding the the less powerful city for 89 days, reducing it to rubble, military action by United Nations forces was vetoed by the United kingdom. Although the U.N. set multiple cease fires in place, all were violated, most within hours. Once Vukovar fell,the first mass...

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