Bouchards View Of Canadian His Essay

5776 words - 23 pages

Lucien Bouchard is one of Canada's most interesting politicians. Born in the 1930s to a rural town in Quebec, Bouchard rose to become Quebec's present premier. Most federalists have characterized Bouchard as an enemy of Canada but it is important to recognize the events that shaped the political figure we see today. Bouchard's version of Canadian history was based on his experiences living in an isolated area ruled by Anglophones, his education, the nationalism of his homeland and the influences of many sovereigntists. His version differs considerably from the federalist perspective and sometimes even the history books. However, the fact remains that a fire burns within this charismatic leader to lead his province to the future of sovereignty he desperately believes is the only solution for the emancipation of Quebec.It is often believed that a person is most often a reflection of their environment, this true for Lucien Bouchard.. Lucien grew up in the town of Jonquiere in the northern part of Quebec. It was a small, poor Francophone town virtually cut off from the rest of Quebec and Canada by the Laurentian Mountains. Bouchard grew up in a family of five children in a strict french catholic household. Their family was relatively poor, as were most of the Francophones in the area. Philippe Bouchard, Lucien's father, worked fourteen hour days delivering lumber. When the boys were old enough, they too had to work to support the family. One summer, Lucien was sent to the labour camps in the Laurentides forests. The camps were owned and operated by the English who ruled the major industries in the Saguenay. This was Lucien's first real taste of the division between the English and the French. Bouchard was a young intellectual who had already developed a strong sense of pride and at the labour camps he was forced to work with "bums, tough guys who beat me, threw knives." (Martin, 1997). The humiliation was almost more than he could handle. The English did not have to work in such conditions because they were the bosses. They made up only two per cent of the Saguenay - Lac -Saint- Jean region but they controlled one hundred per cent of the industry.After the labour camps, Lucien had a heightened awareness of how the other side lived. Lucien would travel with his father sometimes delivering lumber to the next town over of Arvida. The Anglophones in Arvida saw the french as inferior to themselves and took pride in the fact that most did not speak french even though they had lived there for years. However, for young boys like Lucien they had to speak some English in order to get a job. Arvida was a housing seetlement for those that worked for Alcan, the aluminum company. Alcan owned all of the houses and it was clear that no Francophone could rent in the better districts even if they could pay. "The Anglos considered the French to be second class citizens, like Negroes in the south." commented Joan Bell , who lived in the town.(Martin, 1997) Lucien's...

Find Another Essay On Bouchards view of canadian his

AP Essay: Excerpt from Ignor Stravinsky. Rhetorical modes Stravinsky uses in order to convey his point of view

576 words - 2 pages In this passage, Stravinsky discusses orchestra conductors, making observations and conclusions concerning their true necessity. He seemingly has carefully studied conductors' behavior and effectively conveys his view to the reader. To present his point of view clearly, Stravinsky makes use of diction, satirical statements, and comparisons.Stravinsky manipulates his diction throughout the passage. He often uses quotations to place emphasis on

Describe Piaget's View Of And Research On (A) Infants' Understanding Of Objects, And (B) Infants' Ability To Imitate. Discuss To What Extent His View Has Been Supported By Subsequent Research

2190 words - 9 pages Piaget's constructive approach of intellectual development had provided a comprehensive account of human development. Subsequent researches were devised basing on his perspective, nevertheless, with a somewhat different result. This essay aims to investigate Piaget's view and research on infants' understanding of objects and ability to imitate. The starting point will be a brief introduction on Piaget's theory, and then, concept of object

"Camus and the Absurd": Essay explores the existentialist reasonings of Albert Camus and discusses his view of the self in comparison to other existentalist thinkers

985 words - 4 pages resolve to his dissatisfaction with confronting the absurd. This view isn't necessarily incorrect, however, it avoids the question that Camus considers fundamental; is it necessary to assert that there is something more in order to live?Personally, I think that Camus' views on the absurd are the most satisfying because he does not try to hide from the fact that there is no true way of finding the meaning of life as far as we can know and his prescription for living with this, to just accept it and find happiness within this setting is the most gratifying solution there is.

Assess the view that the collapse of the Weimar Republic was primarily due to the appeal of Hitler and his Nazi Party

1976 words - 8 pages Modern History Assessment"Assess the view that the collapse of the Weimar Republic was primarily due to the appeal of Hitler and his Nazi Party."The Weimar Republic was incepted after the fall of the Hollenzollern Dynasty in 1918, and was, from the outset, a government riddled with weakness and incompetence in a variety of crucial social, economic and political areas. This social democratic regime was vulnerable to a range of influences

"In little Dorrit Dickens achieves his most striking effects through symbol and image; the plot is of secondary importance." Examine this view of the novel

755 words - 3 pages of internalising negative emotions. There are parallels between physical prisons such as the Marshalsea and the less tangible (though no less present) prisons of the characters minds. Even when out of the prison, both William Dorrit and his son tip withhold the same prison mentality, "Wherever he went, this foredoomed Tip appeared to take the prison walls with him. . .until the real immovable Marshalsea walls asserted their fascination over him

"You Can Never Really Understand A Person Until You Consider Things From His Point Of View". Discuss This Quote From 'To Kill A Mockingbird'by Harper Lee

1167 words - 5 pages "You can never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view".To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel which embodies many themes and one of the most important in this book is its exploration of the moral nature of human beings. Because the book is written through Scout's perspective of childhood innocence, the result of this portrayal leads the readers to one of the book's important subthemes which involves the threat that

THROUGH THE VIEW OF A READER, THE REASONS WHY MACBETH IS MORE GUILTY BY HIS ACTIONS THEN LADY MACBETH IS BY HERS

767 words - 3 pages THROUGH THE VIEW OF A READER, THE REASONS WHY MACBETH IS MORE GUILTY BY HIS ACTIONS THEN LADY MACBETH IS BY HERS.Macbeth is a very exciting story containing all kinds of plots and murders. The charactersthat are killing and are planning murders are all very deceiving and treacherous. Two ofthe most dangerous criminals in this play are Lady Macbeth and her husband. Together theycommit the most dreadful murder by killing the King; Duncan. This is

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view – until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” Discuss this statement, with reference to ‘To Kill a...

1151 words - 5 pages Compare/Contrast Essay Compare/Contrast Essay "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view, until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." Discuss this statement with reference to "To Kill a Mockingbird" and "A Time to Kill" The novel To Kill a Mockingbird (TKaM) and the film A Time to Kill (ATtK) were set in the south of the United States in the

The essay deals with Kant and how his view on rationailty determine's his view on morality, referring to his idea of duty

761 words - 3 pages of the good will or it is the object of the good will.. The concept of the good will, according to Kant, leads us to the concept of the motive of duty We act from this motive of duty when we exhibit a good will, in spite of our being imperfect beings who are prone to temptation and often fail to have a good will. For example, we cannot say that God acts from duty, since God's will would not feel bound to be good: His will would just

A Freudian interpretation of William Golding’s Lord of the Flies might see Piggy, Ralph, and Jack as the competing demands of the super-ego, the ego and the id respectively. If so, what view of human...

937 words - 4 pages A Freudian interpretation of William Golding's Lord of the Flies might see Piggy, Ralph, and Jack as the competing demands of the super-ego, the ego and the id respectively. If so, what view of human nature does Golding present in his novel?William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies is a story of schoolboys being dropped onto an island from their home of England, without any adults or any sign of life beside themselves. A Freudian interpretation

A Freudian interpretation of William Golding’s Lord of the Flies might see Piggy, Ralph, and Jack as the competing demands of the super-ego, the ego and the id respectively. If so, what view of human...

935 words - 4 pages A Freudian interpretation of William Golding's Lord of the Flies might see Piggy, Ralph, and Jack as the competing demands of the super-ego, the ego and the id respectively. If so, what view of human nature does Golding present in his novel?William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies is a story of schoolboys being dropped onto an island from their home of England, without any adults or any sign of life beside themselves. A Freudian interpretation

Similar Essays

Bouchards View Of Canadian His Essay

5993 words - 24 pages Lucien Bouchard is one of Canada's most interesting politicians. Born in the 1930s to a rural town in Quebec, Bouchard rose to become Quebec's present premier. Most federalists have characterized Bouchard as an enemy of Canada but it is important to recognize the events that shaped the political figure we see today. Bouchard's version of Canadian history was based on his experiences living in an isolated area ruled by Anglophones, his education

Is Hamlet's View Of His Father A Believable One?

1662 words - 7 pages Is Hamlet's View Of His Father A Believable One?In this essay I am going to explore Hamlet's view of his father and see if it is a believable one. In the play we learn that Hamlet loved his father and felt great grief when he died. Hamlet has always had a very high opinion of his father and because his mother married again so quickly Hamlet only has his step-dad Claudius to compare his father to.He hates Claudius so much because he has taken his

The Changing View Of Man, The Cosmos And His Place

1565 words - 6 pages metaphysical allowing people to imagine the world differently from a new point of view (Wertheim, ch.2, pg.52). Perspective painters inspired Nicolaus Copernicus to envision the universe differently that he came up with idea of a heliocentric model, having the sun at the center of the universe instead of the earth. His discovery was a threat to the Catholic Church because the geocentric model had always symbolized the hierarchy of priest

What Is The Connection Between Kant's View On Suicide And His Understanding Of The Moral Law?

871 words - 3 pages In his "Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals", Kant puts forward the view that suicide is inconsistent with the idea of humanity as an end in itself, and that ultimately suicide is morally wrong. According to Kant there is one Categorical Imperative, which should act as the supreme principle of morality. Kant highlights the categorical imperative in three different formulations, but emphasises the fact that these formulations essentially