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Bram Stoker’s Dracula Essay

1468 words - 6 pages

In the 19th century, this basis of scary and thriller books started to emerge. This essay will be about who Dracula enticed women, how his detainer was unsettling and demonic. How the era in which the novel was written plays a part in the ideas of Dracula and how behaves; with such things as women, food, and Harker. The Victorian era definitely influenced the writing of the time through reflections of exploitation of women and a certain darkness in ones self, also explains of mystery and suspense.
Abraham (Bram) Stoker was born in Dublin in 1847, the third of seven children. As a child he was sickly and bedridden. To entertain him, his mother would tell him horror stories. He overcame his illness and, by the time he entered Trinity College, he was tall, powerful and excelled at athletics” (Welling, Shielda). Not long after, he was hired as a civil servant at Dublin Castle, home to British royals in Ireland from the early 1800s to the early 1920s. (Abraham Stoker). Turning to fiction later in life, Stoker published his masterpiece, Dracula, in 1897. Deemed a classic horror novel not long after its release, Dracula has continued to garner acclaim for more than a century, inspiring the creation of hundreds of film, theatrical and literary adaptations. (Abraham Stoker) In 1897, Stoker published his masterpiece, Dracula. While the book garnered success after its release, its popularity has continued to grow for more than a century. (Abraham Stoker)
Mystery, and suspense is thrown directly at your face when you read this novel. Stoker sets the tone for the creepiness of Dracula by saying, “It is strange that as yet I have not seen The Count eat or drink”(Stoker, 35). As human we are accustom to seeing each other consume food and drink. When Jonathan Harkers see’s the Count doing this he immediately finds this behave strange and (inhuman). Another explain of strange and mysterious “Within, stood a tall old man, clean-shaven save for a long white mustache, and clad and black from head to feet, without a single speck of colour about him anywhere”(Stoker, 20). Transylvania location, what is now central Romania, is near the Mediterranean Sea and generally the people have natural a nice dark tan complexion. Another description of the Count, “For a man who was never in the country, and who did not evidently do much in the way of business, his knowledge and acumen were wonderful”(Stoker, 42). For a man who has no color, seems to have a very vast knowledge of countries it appears that he has never been to. To further analysis the Count, ”There is a reason why all things are as they are” (Bram Stoker Quotes). That shows how the Count realizes that he is different, and he is made this way for a specific reason. We later find out that he is a Vampire and the reason for his being is to feast on the living.
Suspense is a reoccurring theme in this novel, Dracula. The Count touched Hakers and made him feel: “ As the count leaned over me and his hands touched...

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