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Bram Stoker's Dracula: A Variation Of A Classic Work In Modern Time

1986 words - 8 pages

A woman changes everything; finally there is vindication for the knight who gave up life to avenge the death of his one true love, as he chose to become the undead. Director, Francis Ford Coppola, in his work, “Bram Stoker’s Dracula”, reaches beyond the words to prove Dracula was more than a monster in creating the movie. Coppola focuses on Dracula as a man, as well as a knight, who is both deeply in love with his church and his bride. The historical elements in the writings of Bram Stoker come to life more so in Coppola’s work with the movie, than in the book. My goal of this paper is to prove how the differences between the book and the movie are predominantly in the beginning and in the end of the film and depict Dracula as the man he was before he became a monster. Aside from the commentary in the Blu-Ray edition of the Director’s Cut, of the movie, I could not find any sources that spoke of the specific, in depth, changes in the movie, most reviews that I found focused more on actor performances and costume design, than the literary work itself.
Historical Background
As with time a story changes each time it is told. Some things are left out while others are personified in ways the original author never intended them to be. Whether it is of choice or not, the root of the work remains the same. This is the case with Coppola’s work on Bram Stoker’s Dracula. The prologue of the movie details the history of Vlad III Dracula also given the name Vlad III, Vlad Tepes; Tepes meaning “Imaler”, given the name by how he chose to torture and execute his victims. In 1410, the Holy Roman Emperor founded a secret fraternal order to uphold Christianity and defend the Empire against Ottoman Turks. This order was known by its emblem of a dragon with its wings extended hanging on a cross and was known as the Order of the Dragon. Although the movie, nor the book go into deep detail of the early years of Vlad Tepes III, I feel it is relevant to his character as a Romanian Christian Knight and his decision to renounce God, his church and the sacred Order in which he fought so bravely. For those who found themselves at his mercy were shown none. There were no immunity to his madness.
Vlad III (Vlad Dracul), was born to a Transylvanian noblewoman and her husband, Vlad II. Vlad III was the middle child and had an older and a younger brother. At the time of his birth his father Vlad II was living in exile in Transylvania. Vlad II, was admitted to the Order for his bravery and was a ruler of Wallachia.
The word for dragon in Romanian is "drac" and "ul" is the definitive article. Vlad III’s father thus came to be known as "Vlad Dracul," or "Vlad the dragon." In Romanian the ending "ulea" means "the son of". Under this interpretation, Vlad III thus became Vlad Dracula, or "the son of the dragon." (The word "drac" also means "devil" in Romanian. The sobriquet thus took on a double meaning for enemies of Vlad Tepes and his father.) Porter, Ray. “The Historical...

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