Brave New World Essay

2846 words - 11 pages

A utopian world was an illusory paradise where everything was in perfect order, and its inhabitants had unlimited freedom to express their individuality and to obtain happiness. Happiness was the state of independently acquiring genuine emotional bliss, without the help of artificial devices. In Brave New World, humanity established a "perfect" society, independent of the old, uncivilized world known as the Savage Reservation. Science had a breakthrough with biological and emotional engineering, intercepting nature's ability to run its own course. Technology had also found a "cure" for misery; everyone living in Brave New World was "happy." Regardless of how beautiful this dream might appear, it would never be achieved. John, who had experienced life in the Savage Reservation was presented with the opportunity to join the ranks of "civilization." Initially, he excitedly embraced this world, but later he became disillusioned. The Savage's recognition of the flaws in the artificiality of scientific technology, in Lenina's promiscuous behaviour, and in the Controller's moral values, demonstrated the impossibility of building a utopian world.John first displayed his protest at the sight of the clones created under Bokanovsky's Process, the first recognizable flaw of Brave New World. This occurred outside the Hospital of the Dying, when John was grieving over the death of his mother. He witnessed a mob of 162 indistinguishable Delta's, assembled into two groups anticipating the distribution of their daily soma rations. Although John's mind was now full of sorrow, he discovered a "sinking sense of horror and disgust, for the recurrent"¦nightmare of swarming indistinguishable sameness. Twins, twins"¦Like maggots they had swarmed defilingly over the mystery of Linda's death."1 This displayed his repugnance towards these identical creatures and the technology that stripped them of their individuality. The monocultured society where personal identity ceased to exist appalled him. The Savage could not accept Bokanovsky's Process, ""¦one of the major instruments of social stability"2 in this idealistic society. He could not appreciate the biologically engineered sameness of the Bokanovskified operators. The sight of uniformity and the lack of individuality in the clones disgusted John, revealing to him a horrid aspect of this society. John recognized this as a flaw of Brave New World, that is, the method of reproduction that eliminated personal character and an individual identity.The Savage first experienced the effects of the Feelie on a rendezvous with Lenina. Feelies was developed from emotional engineering technology that allowed feelings to be manufactured. They are pictures that presented the audience with visual images, auditory sounds, and physical sensations. He felt the kissing sensation and became repulsed at the Feelie effects. He said to Lenina, "I don't think you ought to see things like that"¦Like this horrible...

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