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Brave New World By Aldous Huxley And Technology

1964 words - 8 pages

“COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY”: this is the World State's motto in a science fiction novel “Brave New World” written by Aldous Leonard Huxley in 1932. Huxley predicts the future world ironically, and I assume everyone hopes his prediction will not come true. Fortunately, Huxley’s brave new world is just a fictional world; no one knows whether Huxley’s brave new world will become a reality or not. However, technology improves rapidly and scares people that their world is gradually approaching to Huxley’s brave new world. So, my question is “Could the brave new world become a reality?” The answer is “yes.” The recent research shows the success of cloning and the prevention of aging in animal experiments, which implies that the technology we have now can actualize some parts of Huxley’s brave new world in the nonhuman animal kingdom. Hence, technology could actualize Huxley’s brave new world at the human level as well. Additionally, the actualized brave new world can be even more extreme because of immortality, and therefore, future scientists and engineers are required to make proper choices in order to prevent an extremely totalitarian community.
To begin with, cloning is a process that produces a set which contains the same gene set, and Huxley’s brave new world depicts a society of human cloning. In general, people think cloning as a process duplicating something which already exists. A science article defines the word cloning as “[a process producing] an individual grown from a single somatic cell of its parent and generically identical to it” (Fackelmann 92). However, this definition defines just somatic cell cloning, which is one of cloning types. DNA cloning, cellular cloning and generic cloning are examples of the other types of cloning. The author of “Ethical Aspects of Cloning Techniques” captures cloning as a big picture and defines as follows. “Cloning is the process of producing ‘genetically identical’ organisms. It may involve division of a single embryo, in which case both the nuclear genes and the small number of mitochondrial genes would be ‘identical’, or it may involve nuclear transfer, in which case only the nuclear genes would be ‘identical’, But genes may be mutated or lost during the development of the individual: the gene set may be identical but it is unlikely that the genes themselves would ever be totally identical. In the present context, we use the term ‘genetically identical’ to mean ‘sharing the same nuclear gene set’” (Ethical Aspects of Cloning Techniques 349). In other words, clone is a group which shares the same generic set. This definition includes the first definition, which is somatic cell cloning, and other types of cloning. Although the technology of cloning gets attention of public mainly at the animal level, it was originally applied to plants. For example, grafting makes new individuals which have the same characteristics as their parent plant because extensions from branches are created by somatic cell...

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