This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Brave New World, By Aldous Huxley: Exploring Huxley's Accuracy Of The Future.

929 words - 4 pages

Brave New World Essay TestBrave New RealitiesIn a high school bathroom, a young girl is casually taking narcotics, the twelfth visitor that the lavatories have seen this day for the same purpose. A man peers into a bottle in a science lab as he pours more DNA samples into the container. As a woman drives home from work, she repeats the phrase 'There's a little McDonalds, in everyone." Aldous Huxley created a remarkable world, one that introduced many new aspects into a simple life, aspects which at that time (1932) would have been thought of as ridiculous and bizarre. Now, in 2002, it seems as though Huxley's futuristic world was not a frivolous guess at what humanity would some day come to, but an accurate imagination of what the world would begin to look like at the end of the twentieth century. The casualty and misuse of drugs, genetic engineering studies and modern society's mass media has helped to shape this age's own brave new world.As different drugs are produced, the affect and uses of them are changing. Drugs are no longer used strictly for medicinal or indecent purposes, but are now most commonly used for enjoyment or enhancement. Euphorics, narcotics, hallucinogens, depressants, and tranquillizers have all become widespread caused by the peoples desire to improve or change their perceptions of life. In Brave New World (BNW), Huxley created the wonder drug 'Soma.' This is used several times a day as a reward, holiday, escape from reality, or because one feels entitled to it (127). Its use had become so customary in their society, that when some one did not use the substance that was odd. Now a day, the majority of people are not drug users, but the statistics are growing. As peoples lives become more stressful, drugs are becoming more available, and more drugs are being produced for different needs, substances will be used more and more to try and change or contain ones life. Soma was used as a way to keep constancy and power over ones life whenever needed. The reason for casual drug use now is very similar. Society is continually trying to change the way that they live their life, and drugs are one gateway to which they can achieve this.In BNW genetic engineering, enhancements, and control were a huge part of their society. Every World State body was a perfect example of how their world controlled the way they were produced and raised. As the twentieth century advances in science, similar topics are coming up. Cloning has become successful in animals, and Italian scientists are now thrilled that they have begun work on humans. Somatic cell manipulation is also a broad topic now that they have started gene therapy, as well as human germline manipulation. These are the thoughts...

Find Another Essay On Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley: exploring Huxley's accuracy of the future.

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

1123 words - 4 pages The society in "Brave New World", by Aldous Huxley, is exceptionally different from society today. Acts that are accepted in today's society are frowned upon in the society Huxley creates, such as, worshipping God, and marriage. Science and technology rule the society in Brave New World, and due to this, society is incredibly efficient and productive. One might see the society in Brave New World as improved and beneficial, but despite the

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

1988 words - 8 pages Brave New WorldSociety is made up of the morals and beliefs of man intertwined with the foggy nature of science. However, science and society do not necessarily mix. In the book, "Brave New World," by Aldous Huxley, a world without emotion and human nature is created in order to fit a perfect caste system within society. The name of this society is the World State and it is powered by engineers, scientists, and counselors that control the

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

1854 words - 8 pages In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, a haunting warning of a possible future for the world is presented to readers. The novel’s world is composed of dystopian strata plagued by a dependence on drugs, technology, and a well-defined social class system. Huxley’s uncanny foresight specific to segregation and social class strata is startling because readers do not expect to find aspects of Brave New World’s segregation and class structure in modern

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

840 words - 4 pages In Aldous Huxley's novel, "Brave New World" he introduces a character named, Bernard Marx an alpha part of the upper higher class who does not quite fit in. Bernard is cursed by the surrounding rumors of something going wrong during his conditioning that he becomes bitter and isolates himself from those around him in the World State. Huxley's character experiences both alienation and enrichment to being exiled from a society that heavily relies

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

1541 words - 6 pages reasons for what one believesfor other bad reasons-that's philosophy. People believe in God because they'vebeen conditioned to.Personal commentI regard Brave New World as a very interesting book. Aldous Huxley had a good idea of a future society and he expressed his idea very well. The novel is written very vividly and impressively. It is especially suitable for people who are both interested in the future, progress and technology and who also aren't

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

871 words - 3 pages conflict either Communist or Communist-controlled, (at one instance a character refers to his friend as “Comrade”). Threats of a totalitarian communist based government were a huge concern of George Orwell. Aldous Huxley Utopia does not have a particular basis to ground it in, so therefore it is more likely than 1984 to happen in the present or near future. The society shown in Brave New World has more of an opportunity to arise in modern times

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

760 words - 3 pages Aldous Huxley saw problems with the world, and he wrote a novel about a fictional solution. In his novel, Brave New World, people of the distant future are part of a radical new society. the planners of this utopic system of social organization seek to abolish inequalities among humans, social unrest, war, unhappiness, and the miserable human condition. Although this utopia is set hundreds of years into the future, it contains elements of our

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - 1618 words

1618 words - 6 pages Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World, a novel by Aldous Huxley was written at a tine in history when war had ravaged much of the nation, Depression was blanketing society, and people’s wills were being put to the test. Science had become an overwhelming force for better or for worse. People had witnessed science saving and preventing millions of lives with vaccinations and such, but on the contrary, had also witnessed it kill

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley - 1403 words

1403 words - 6 pages Importance of Community Stability Identity in Brave New WorldA Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a great example of a dystopia as he creates the “perfect world” where everyone is happy in their own place in society. Huxley tries to create an ideal society by imposing the Community Stability Identity. This seemingly intelligent invention had many elaborate steps to ensure stability. This process included genetic engineering, known as

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

891 words - 4 pages unpredictable. By removing disease, war, famine, and the like, the world government has a greater sense of control. By promoting the three principles the Controllers have created a situation that they believe is a happy, utopian society. Works Cited Brave New World Aldous Huxley

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

1674 words - 7 pages Brave New World Analysis 1/3 1) One of the biggest conflicts witnessed so far in the first 90 pages of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is the internal one within the main protagonist, Bernard Marx. Throughout the book, Bernard encounters a violent conflict within himself. He was born different from everyone else, and he finds himself many times questioning the system, he feels that there is much more to be/accomplish in life than just having

Similar Essays

"The Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley

961 words - 4 pages This is just a : Do you want to live in this world essay.The Brave New WorldIn The Brave New World, their society is unique compared to the reality that I live in. They may have many advantages and disadvantages if it is compared to our society. Brave New World's utopia would be nice to have in our society. Having to place myself in their world would never happen. I do not think living in the utopia of brave new world would suit me.Living in

Satire Of The Utopian Future: Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

1983 words - 8 pages While the knowledge of the world around man may open door to him, it leaves his mind filled with endless thoughts that weigh on him. In Aldous Huxley’s novel Brave New World, Huxley describes a satiric version of the utopian future where humans are genetically bred and classically conditioned to live passively and happily in their subservient culture. Throughout the novel, this idea of happiness verses knowledge and intelligence is brought

The Dystopian Society Of Brave New World, By Aldous Huxley

1416 words - 6 pages A dystopia is an imaginary, imperfect place where those who dwell are faced with terrible circumstances. The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley illustrates the concept of a dystopia. A utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect, but in the novel, it becomes apparent that the author is trying to demonstrate the negative effects on a society when it attempts to become an unreachable utopian society. Brave New World is seen as a

Overview Of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1543 words - 6 pages experiences in Italy under the reign of fascist leader Benito Mussolini (Barron's Educational Series). Huxley was deeply troubled by threats to individual freedom and independence; in Europe in the 1920’s and early 1930’s, these were threatened by the rise of totalitarian governments (Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World Historical Context). Huxley envisions the birth of a scientific dictatorship, which slowly exorcises individuality out of