"Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley In Many Ways, John's Presence In The "Brave New World" Is Very Antagonistic.

1038 words - 4 pages

Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" is a science fiction novel about a society conditioned to believe in certain things and to act certain ways. They are taught prejudices against other types of people, they are taught to dislike and to fear nature, and furthermore, are conditioned to take a drug - soma - when things are going badly, in order to keep them in a positive, happy and comfortable state all the time. Many can argue that this World State is a very fake, manufactured society taught only happiness and nothing that has to do with negative aspects of life, such as unhappiness, illness, pain, or misery. In the novel, John, a Savage who is introduced to the society, chooses to oppose this system rather than to conform to it. He chooses to rebel, and be a freethinking individual. In many ways, John's presence in the Brave New World is very antagonistic.The people conditioned in the Brave New World are taught to take soma during times of difficulty or pain. It numbs them and brings them away from reality in order that they do not have to experience these difficulties of life, but instead, can enjoy a "soma holiday." In the novel, John's mother, Linda, goes on a permanent soma holiday, resulting in her unfortunate and untimely death. This may have been the anchor that caused John's hatred for the drug that hinders people from experiencing life the way that it should be experienced. During an occurrence of soma distribution, John courageously confronts those who are in line ready to accept their rations of soma. He wished to challenge the society to change into one where people could have freedom. In many ways, he wished to bring back the innocence and purity that had been very much present before the Brave New World society had begun. He wanted to proclaim this innocence, much like how "Miranda was proclaiming the possibility of loveliness, the possibility of transforming even the nightmare into something fine and noble " (210).Moreover, people in the society are conditioned to be very promiscuous and erotic when it comes to their sex lives. Children would play "naked in the warm June sunshine ... running with shrill yells over the lawns, or playing ball games, or squatting silently in twos and threes among the flowering shrubs" (30). They were taught at a very young age that this sort of behaviour was normal and well accepted in the Brave New World. John falls madly in love with one woman from the society, named Lenina. During one time alone together, Lenina confronts John and comes onto him sexually, removing her clothes and letting her "zippicamiknicks [lie] lifeless and as though deflated on the floor" (193). John is like any other man, with the same desires and lusts and thoughts that any man may face. And although this would be in many ways any man's dream, he is suddenly very angered by Lenina's actions, and begins yelling insults such as "Damned whore!" (194) and scares her into the other room. John struggles...

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