Brave New World Summary Essay

1190 words - 5 pages


Basic Plot:
This novel takes place in the year 632 A.F. The government controls the population of Utopia, there are only test tube births and an artificial process for multiplying the embryos. Marriage is forbidden. There are ten World Controllers; these people control the government and all of their plans. In the very beginning there are students being given a guided party line tour through the London Hatcheries. Two employees that work there are Henry Foster and Lenina Crowne, they have been dating each other too much and are discouraged by the state. So Lenina’s best friend, Fanny, picks on her because of this. Lenina then meets Bernard Marx, and grows to like him so much that she agrees to go on a vacation with him to a New Mexican Savage Reservation. This is a place where people are sent to if they do not abide to the laws of the Utopian world. This is where problems begin to happen and the Director of Hatcheries, Tomakin, threatens exile to Marx if he does not mend his ways, for he has become very out spoken.

While at this reservation Lenina and Bernard meet a savage, John, and his mother Linda. From talking to John and Linda, Bernard pieces together their past. He finds out that Linda traveled to the Reservation with Tomakin years ago and became pregnant; therefore Tomakin left her at the reservation never to see her again. Linda gave birth, to John, therefore breaking a law and never being permitted to enter Utopia again. Bernard and Lenina brought Linda and John back to Utopia with the permission of one of the World Controllers. When they arrive home Bernard finds out that the Directors o Hatcheries is about to exile him, then which Marx produces

John and Linda that greet him as son and wife. Tomakin then resigned in disgrace.

Bernard and a friend, Helmholtz Watson, help to adjust John to Utopia, and spend each day showing off Utopia to him. John becomes more disgusted and appalled with each passing day. Mean while, Lenina has become infatuated with John and made sexual advances toward him, and this ruins his image of her as an object of worship, so he spurns her. Soon his mother died and John went berserk and tried to lecture the Utopians back to sanity. A riot takes place and Bernard and Helmholtz are exiled, but John is ordered to stay behind. John is determined to escape Utopia and flees to a deserted spot outside London. But Utopia comes to him and, he is hounded by the press and the public to the point of mental exhaustion. He then falls victim to the very Utopian vices, which he hated. Finally he comes to his senses and takes his life as the only way out.

Main Characters:
Bernard Marx- small and ugly due to an accident prior to his decanting, he hates the Utopian system that made him a misfit
John- born outside Utopia and brought to it, his goodness and honesty contrast sharply with the Utopians
Lenina Crowne- uncommonly pretty nurse at the hatchery, she is flighty and sentimental, she dates Bernard and Henry
Tomakin-...

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