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Bread A Crop Essay

1346 words - 5 pages

“Here is bread, which strengthens man’s heart, and therefore called the staff of life,” said Matthew Henry, a greatly famous English Churchman (“Matthew Henry......”). This quote better shows the profound positive effects that wheat has had on humanity and reinstates the importance this cereal grain has to industrialized nations today. Known for being the driving force behind a vast number of different industries, wheat has given birth to countless other commodities, including bread, pasta, beer, and cereal (“Wheat.......”). This widely over-looked crop’s importance has persisted from the earliest, innovation-laden times to the most modern, bustling societies. Without a doubt, wheat has facilitated both ancient and current civilizations as it has grown to become one of the most fundamental staple foods that exists today.
Dating back 11,000 years ago to the Middle-East, this advantageous crop was first grown by the hunter-gatherers and nomadic people who first inhabited the Mesopotamian region. However, it was only 7,000 years later until civilizations started taking advantage of the bountiful amount of assets that come along with this otherwise-wasted cereal grain. For instance, the Egyptians, known for their ingenious inventions, started using wheat to make bread for the first time using the newly - invented bread oven (“Karen.....”). About 2,000 years later, the Romans discovered yet another aspect of harvesting wheat - the use of animal power to plow wheat (“The History....”).
Although, the Egyptians and Romans had already greatly enriched the art and technique of wheat harvesting by the Industrial Revolution, the mass-production of machinery was furthermore beneficial to the development of this crop. During this period in written history, inventions, such as the mechanical seed drill, were being designed to lessen labor hours and higher yield rates. In short, as time transpired and populations grew, the harnessing, production, and use of wheat all drastically increased and improved for years to come (“The History......”).
Through diaspora, the spread of ideas, inventions, and thoughts, wheat branched out to continental Europe and Asia where it began to be used for other profitable uses, such as the growth of wheat for beer, barley, and pasta. The cause of this rapid diffusion and high-profitability occurred as a result of wandering nomads who constantly spread ideas to continental regions of the world, including the Middle-East, Egypt, and even the Far-East.
While wandering nomads spread the idea of growing wheat to other parts of mainland Europe and Asia, certain expeditions, such as that of Christopher Columbus, promoted the benefits of wheat overseas. The Columbian Exchange, which involved the trading of commodities between Europe and the Americas, was one such barter that resulted in the mass production of wheat in the United States of America (“Long Sol.....”).
After witnessing the high profitabilities that resulted from...

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