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Short Description And Explanation Of Forensics In The Legal System

545 words - 2 pages

According to dictionary.com, forensics is "the use of science and technology to investigate and establish facts in criminal or civil courts of law." In fact, forensics science plays the strongest role in solving any crime. There are a variety of methods involved with solving crimes; the main two are witness accounts and forensics evidence.Witness accounts and other human dependability prove to be inferior to the power of forensics science. There are several reasons that investigators prefer forensics, such as, witnesses are unreliable in that the evidence they provide could be misleading, sketchy and unpredictable. Also they could be covering for the criminal or themselves, making them untrustworthy. To this effect, there is no sure way to tell a lie from truth in these accounts. Lastly, witness accounts can be shaky and unstable. They are subject to cross examination, and the pressure could change answers, or the entire account. Therefore witness accounts are just a base and are often disregarded when forensics are involved.Forensics science is a much stronger instigator. Several methods can be used, from physical to mental to biological. A strong psychological method is that of behavioral profiling. These are compiled by psychologists for a possible suspect; the process is done through evidence provided to the psychologists, in which they process and give obscure, unique details about the possible suspect. Handwriting identification is done through experts that study a signature given to them and try to match it to that of a suspect captured by the police. These are most often used in...

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