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Short Review Of Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre"

558 words - 2 pages

When a caterpillar hatches from its mother's egg, it enters this world as an innocent, pure creature. As time passes by, it unwraps its cocoon and goes through metamorphosis. Once the caterpillar grows into a fully developed butterfly, it has lost its innocence and purity forever. Jane was an inexperienced caterpillar but her stay at Lowood and her challenging time at Thornfield with Mr. Rochester has changed her into an independent, matured butterfly.When Jane was young, she taught herself to be virtuous. Her aunt's criticisms and punishments has made Jane realize that she wasn't treated as part of the family. Her development of determination and self-reliance become more superior each day she spent at Gateshead. Jane states: '...I hate to live here.' This quote proves that Jane hated Gateshead and she was determined to find a better place.The place Jane found was the Lowood Institution for orphans. It was not a better place but it helped Jane stand on her own feet. Through the help of Helen Burns, Jane has learned to love, forget hatred and live her life in happiness. Helen states: 'Life appears too short to be spent in nursing animosity, or registering wrongs.' These words shows that Helen is more mature and experienced than Jane. Jane observes: 'Miss Temple is full of goodness...' Miss Temple was another great influence in Jane's life, she treated Jane as if she were her own daughter. We realize now that Jane was no longer alone. She had friends to love her and guide her to the next step in life. Jane had not only gained more experience and confidence, she also achieved a great...

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