Broadcasting Funding In South Africa Essay

1839 words - 7 pages

South Africa is currently an economic leader among the continent of Africa (second only to Nigeria in terms of GDP, yet South Africa has a much smaller population). However, within the worldwide context, South Africa has and continues to endure many issues socially, politically and economically. Because of these, the broadcast news system, comprising of television and radio, has endured an interesting and tumultuous past, and most importantly faces a fascinating future in terms their unique funding model. That being said, the models of both television and radio in South Africa leads one to question the effectiveness of the broadcast system in providing news and content that is fair, unbiased and most importantly critical in helping members of the community make informed decisions about their own country. Beginning in 1923, radio was the only form of broadcast news for a number of decades. Initially being founded by South African Railways at this time, several other clubs and broadcasting associations followed suit, being financially dependent on listeners’ licensing fees to access these stations. With the limited coverage capabilities of the independent broadcasters and increasing debts, the government of South Africa granted permission to the Schlesinger organization to incorporate the independent broadcasters and form the African Broadcasting Company in 1927, aiming to move towards commercial viability in the near future. Following further lack of funding and speculation of mismanagement in broadcasting (a pattern of skepticism to be repeated), Prime Minister General Hertzog established the South African Broadcasting Corporation in 1936. John Reith, who was also credited with developing the BBC’s model, developed this new model of broadcasting. This establishment paved the way for the first major social and financial change in radio – the introduction of Afrikaans and other South African languages to the airwaves and a new market of listeners for commercial advertisers. By the 1950s ‘Springbok radio’ began, introducing most South Africans to ‘commercial radio’ and broadcast entertainment in the form of comedies and dramas. Because of this, radio was able to shift from a purely license fee based financing model to one that could allow funding in the form of advertisements. The original model of radio funding was adopted due to the settler and colonial demands and the ability to pay for the service they desired in specific areas. With a more widespread desire for radio by different groups, there came the need for not only increased coverage, but also a larger variety of radio stations. Because of this, the rising costs of maintaining these networks and stations would require funding that service fees alone could not provide and advertising income could supplement. Furthermore, with the introduction of international content and entertainment, it was inevitable that the radio stations sought financing from advertisers in order to be able...

Find Another Essay On Broadcasting Funding In South Africa

Apartheid in South Africa Essay

1807 words - 7 pages -- 20 April 1964. Rivonia trial Historical Background South Africa is a land of abundant natural resources, mild climate, and fertile lands. Their resources range from diamond and gold to platinum and their land is fertile enough to feed the rest of the world if cultivated intensively. Yet many believed Africa to be the Dark Continent, a continent of poverty, harsh climate, and political turmoil (Woods 10). Though apartheid officially began in

Morality in South Africa Essay

643 words - 3 pages Politicians, religious leaders and social commentators have all spoken about a breakdown in morality in South Africa, with crime as the most commonly cited evidence. The lack of respect for the sanctity of human life, for the next person, private property, disregard for the law of the land, lack of parental control over children, and the general blurring of the lines between right and wrong are continuing to plague our communities. To

Investment in South Africa

1223 words - 5 pages Caltex plant was established in South Africa in 1977 after the owners decided to expand its operations in South Africa. The construction of the plant brought controversy over the interested parties, there were two dimensions of the utilitarian benefits of the Caltex plant, and there were violations of the justice and of moral rights whereas on the other side there were possible benefits to the South Africans. The plant setup was helpful in that

Adolescence in South Africa

1729 words - 7 pages words the individual achieves psychological maturity and social maturity (Mwale, 2010). As a consequence of South Africa’s historical background of Apartheid, adolescence in South Africa and the identity development of nationals has to be carefully analysed as a result of such incidents. In my opinion adolescence is a sensitive period and not a critical period for identity development in South Africans. Critical periods involve the notion of an

Apartheid in South Africa

1347 words - 5 pages Nelson Mandela helped bring an end to Apartheid in South Africa because he was a believer in basic human rights, leading both peaceful and violent protests against the white South African Government. His beliefs landed him in prison for twenty-seven years, almost three decades. In doing so, he became the face of the apartheid movement both in his country and around the world. When released from prison in 1990, he continued to honor his

Apartheid in South Africa.

818 words - 3 pages was. It took a long time for the change to occur but finally it did occur in 1994. This was a day that the black Africans will remember.Willem De Klerk, a white Afrikaner who believed that there should be equality which is what he succeeded in. De Klerk was born on March 18, 1936 in Johannesburg, South Africa. He studied in Potchefstroom University and got a law degree there. De Klerk was elected as the head of the National Party in 1982 in

Fear In South Africa

943 words - 4 pages Cry, the Beloved Country, a book by Alan Paton, deals with the thematic struggle of South Africa and the oppression of blacks. In it, a black parson, Stephan Kumalo, goes on a journey to find his family. Everyday holds new fear, not only for Stephan, but also for everyone in South Africa. Each character in Cry, the Beloved Country has a fear of something, and that fear proves to be an influential force in all of their lives. Stephan Kumalo has a

Apartheid in South Africa

2552 words - 10 pages Origins of Apartheid In the seventeenth century, South Africa was colonized by Dutch and British imperialists. In response to British domination, Dutch settlers made two colonies: The Republic of the Orange Free State and Transvaal. Dutch descendants became known as “Afrikaners” or “Boers.” In the early 1900s, Boers discovered diamonds on their land. This led to a Britain invasion and sparked the Second Boer War, which lasted three years

Gentrification in South Africa

833 words - 3 pages Social Segregation in Cities: GentrificationWhat is gentrification?Gentrification is a process in which low-cost, physically deteriorated neighborhoods experience physical renovation and an increase in property values, along with an increase in wealthier residents who typically replace the prior residents.IntroductionJohannesburg, also known as Egoli is the largest city in South Africa. It is part of the Gauteng province; the most wealthy

Crime in South Africa

1327 words - 5 pages were established in the Presidential priority police station of KaNyamazana and the Provincial priority police stations of Vosman and Embalenhle, these structures have not born any fruit” (Pule: 2006). Crime in South Africa possibly requires a combination both the long term social crime prevention and an effective tough short term law enforcement strategies as was an indication in the NCPS. The only way, however, we can know what actually works

Rape in South Africa

787 words - 3 pages Rape is a very serious crime, which happens far to frequently in our country, often going unnoticed. Rape is always terrible, but even worse when it is committed against children. It is essential that the coming generations know what rape is, how to deal with it if they are ever affected by it.If the comments from the youth in the cartoon are true, South Africa will then continue to feature high up on the sexual offences list. You cannot have

Similar Essays

Apartheid In South Africa Essay

1600 words - 6 pages The word apartheid comes in two forms, one being the system of racial segregation in South Africa, and the other form is the form that only those who were affected by apartheid can relate to, the deeper, truer, more horrifying, saddening and realistic form. The apartheid era truly began when white South Africans went to the polls to vote. Although the United Party and National Party were extremely close, the National party won. Since they

Apartheid In South Africa Essay

2284 words - 9 pages -European groups in the Republic of South Africa” (“Apartheid”). According to Robin Cohen, South African apartheid was based on four basic premises: “white monopoly of political power, the manipulation of space to achieve racial segregation, the control of black labor, and urban social control” (qtd. in Massie 385). Apartheid was widely supported by powerful nations, including the United States. However, the validity of the arguments and

Apartheid In South Africa Essay

856 words - 3 pages Apartheid, the Afrikaans word for “apartness” was the system used in South Africa from the years 1948 to 1994. During these years the nearly 31.5 million blacks in South Africa were treated cruelly and without respect. They were given no representation in parliament even though they made up most of the country. It was not until 1994 when a black man named Nelson Mandela came to power in the South Africa congress. Once elected Mandela removed

Ecotourism In South Africa Essay

1515 words - 6 pages species. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s website, eleven of the 229 mammal species in South Africa remain endangered, fifteen vulnerable, and thirteen near threatened. Mining, which contributes to 18% of the GDP, is detrimental to air quality, causes deforestation, and releases toxic amounts of minerals and heavy metals into the soil and water (“Effects of Mining,” para. 1). Based on a case study from the