This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Slavery In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1540 words - 7 pages

Freedom to do what one pleases has been an essential part of American life since the start of the colonies. Every war in the history of America revolves around some variation of freedom. One war that has lasted the duration of America’s existence includes black people’s fight for their freedom: from the Civil War to Civil Rights. During the first half of civilization in America, slaves were kept in physical captivity, which inhibited their freedom. For the remaining half, slaves were segregated and looked down upon, hindering their mental freedom. Throughout Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, two captives take a journey in order to free themselves, one for mental freedom, and the other, physical. The first, Huck, is a young boy attempting to break free of his upbringing as well as the oppressive caretaking of his guardian Miss Watson and his dad, Pap. The other, Jim, is the slave of Miss Watson, who wants to escape slavery in hopes of reconnecting with his family and from fear of being sold down the river to the Deep South. The two escape separately, without knowing the other one’s plan, but accidentally meet up shortly after running away. They continue down the river on a raft, meeting different people who disrupt their goals for freedom. Although they yearn for different types of freedom, they both go on the journey in hopes of escaping oppression. Huck and Jim, despite obvious racial differences, learn to accept each other, but this was not their main intention. Jim and Huck are like caged birds on their journey: “caged birds accept each other but flight is what they long for”(Tennessee Williams). Although Huck learns to treat Jim with equality, their goal was not to become friends but rather to reach freedom and become individuals.
Huck makes it evident that his main goal was freedom through his tendencies toward Jim. Throughout the book, although staying friendly with Jim, Huck makes references that proves his main goal is not to befriend Jim or deny racism. Huck’s main goal is to escape the traditions that are forced on him by his caretakers. He both subconsciously and consciously wishes to be his own person but is not completely sure how to accomplish that. When Huck goes off on the raft, he has no intentions of meeting up with anybody and coming into contact with Jim is a total surprise. When Huck gets to know Jim better, he realizes that Jim and himself are very similar and that Jim can be considered a real person. This revelation was not what Huck intended to happen when he was on his adventure, it just naturally occurred. The reasons Huck comes to believe Jim is a person not a slave is because he realizes Jim has a family and feelings of his own, and Huck also sees Jim as white because of his decisions. Huck says, “I knowed he was white inside, and I reckoned he’d say what he did say-so it was alright, now,…”(290). This quote explains that Huck sees Jim as an equal now. Because Jim says what Huck thought he would, Huck...

Find Another Essay On Slavery in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Racism in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1437 words - 6 pages In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, events throughout the novel suggest that Huck is a racist to Jim, Miss Watson’s runaway slave, whether he knows it or not. Despite the fact that Huck travels with Jim, he does not care about freeing Jim from slavery. As a result, Twain’s purpose is more focused on the adventures Huck and Jim experience rather than freeing Jim. Throughout the novel, Huck travels with Jim although he never has a plan

Morality in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

755 words - 3 pages Morality in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Samuel L. Clemens's, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is told through the eyes of a young man, the narrator and protagonist, Huckleberry Finn. He learns about life and society through the nature of the world. He finds himself in many unpredictable situations, and constantly in different settings. These settings consist of land, the shore of the Mississippi River, or on a small raft

Morality in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

699 words - 3 pages , Twain saw the institution of religion as hypocritical, impractical, and convoluted. Needless to say, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn hold considerable importance in reflecting Mark Twain’s satirical view on the religious society of his time. Mark Twain introduces his satire of religion in the first few chapters of the novel. A major theme of the novel is the hypocrisy and double standards that are evident in the society surrounding Huck. This

Conflict in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1394 words - 6 pages Perhaps the greatest battle in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is that of the titular character with the society he lives. As he matures throughout the book, Huck cultivates ethical beliefs and a social conscience which he understands to be quite different from that of his society. In the beginning of Huck Finn, social standards are beginning to increasingly influence Huck. However, as Huck is forced to flee from society, he

Racism in the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

785 words - 3 pages A person’s looks can not determine how they feel about a certain race of people. Some of the nicest looking peoples harbor deep feelings of hatred towards races other than their own. Characters like Aunt sally, Uncle Earl, and Miss Watson all seem like very nice people, but they all accept and participate in, whether they realize it or not, racism. Almost all of the characters in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain seem to have

Society in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1700 words - 7 pages Society in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Sometimes making a stand for what is right, especially when it is totally against the customary beliefs of your society, is not an easy accomplishment. In the novel Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, the main character Huck encounters many situations where there is a question of morality. Considering the traditional protocol of his society, Huck has to choose either what his conscience feels is

Twain's Twist on the Metaphor of Slavery in "The Adventures Huckleberry Finn"

959 words - 4 pages Mark Twain uses slavery both as a metaphorical and as a literal image while Huck traverses through the "Sivilized" world, the Romantic world, and the Sacred world in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". The "Sivilized" world, as Huck sees it, is mostly characterized by the strict rules and restrictions laid down by Miss Watson. Escaping through the window into the woods with Tom, his world is restricted specifically to what or how "the books

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1107 words - 4 pages slavery and racism that occurred. However, the use of the word "nigger" makes Huckleberry Finn a tricky novel to teach. One can fully understand why the book has been repeatedly judged as unsuitable for school children to study in the educational system. The word “nigger” is not used to offend anybody but rather to enhance the story and the time period. Twain’s repeated use of that derogatory term in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1358 words - 5 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” is a book written by Mark Twain in the late 19th Century. It is considered a timeless classic. It tells of a poor white boy running away from brutal parents, and of an intelligent African American man who attempting to escape from bondage and free his family from slavery, and it shows how these two men, Huck and Jim, very different individuals overcome their differences to

The adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1060 words - 4 pages There are many opened and closed minded people in the world. In the great novel "The adventures of Huckleberry Finn", Mark Twain shows us that. He shows humans that closed and ignorant lifestyles are destroying society, in such ways as slavery. Twain uses cynicism varietably through the novel by mocking, telling stories, and even in a way curses characters portrayed in the story. He mocks Pap, Tom, and Huck in even some ways. Mark Twain was

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

762 words - 3 pages Censorship is a shroud for the intolerable, a withdrawal from the cold truths of humanity, and ultimately, the suppression of expression. When a book such as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is banned in classrooms, students are not only stripped of an enriching work of literature, but also consequently stripped of the cultural and moral awareness required to survive in a world stained with imperfection and strewn with atrocity. To accurately

Similar Essays

Huckleberry Finn An Anti Slavery Book: The Problem Of Racism In Twain's "Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn"

1963 words - 8 pages years and they had three daughters - Susy, Clara, and Jean. Mark Twain published over 30 works of literature - including satire, historical fiction, short stories, and nonfiction. Many of his writings are considered to be the peak of American literature, including the eternal Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Prince and the Pauper, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. Besides these well-known classics

Symbolism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1228 words - 5 pages trouble in his novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, uses various concrete objects, such as rivers, to symbolize a diverse range of feelings, emotions, and even actions. The ultimate symbol in the novel is the Mississippi River. Rivers often times symbolize "life itself, they are the flux of the world in manifestation, the macrocosm' (Cooper, 139)" (Protas, Allison). "River symbolism is

Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

755 words - 3 pages Mark Twain has always been one of the most controversial authors of all time. Though in recent years, there has been increasing controversy over the ideas expressed in his novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In some extreme cases the novel has even been banned by public school systems and censored by public libraries. The basis for this censorship is the argument that Mark Twain's book is racist, but in reality Twain was against racism

Cruelty In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1049 words - 5 pages cruel to one another”(Twain174). Most of the people that Huck and Jim encounter on their journey down the river are inhumane to other people. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Twain opines that human beings treat their peers with cruelty through seeking attention, greed, and self preservation. Abusive fathers show great cruelty toward their children. Pap is heartless toward Huck even though he is his son. He is very greedy and isn’t worried