Case Brief Of Illinois V. Caballes

1041 words - 5 pages

Case Brief of Illinois v. Caballes
Citation: 543 U.S. 405 (2005)
Case Facts: Roy Caballes was stopped for speeding by an Illinois state trooper Daniel Gillette. During the traffic stop another state trooper Craig Graham of the Illinois State Police Drug Interdiction Team, overheard the stop on the radio and showed up to the scene with a narcotics detection dog. While the first trooper was writing Roy Caballes a warning ticket for speeding the second trooper walked around Roy’s car with the narcotics detection dog. The dog alerted that it had detected narcotics at the rear end of the car which subsequently led to the state troopers searching the trunk of the car. Upon searching the trunk of ...view middle of the document...

The Illinois Supreme Court also concluded that the use of the narcotics detection dog unjustifiably enlarged the scope of a routine traffic stop into a drug investigation. The United State Supreme Court disagreed with the Illinois Supreme Court in that decision.
Case Decision: A narcotics detection dog sniff conducted during a concededly lawful traffic stop that reveals no information other than the location of a substance that no individual has any right to possess does not violate the Fourth Amendment. Six Supreme Court justices voted in favor of this decision and two Supreme Court justices voted against this decision.
Case Reasoning: The initial stop of Roy Caballes for speeding on the highway was based on probable cause and was considered lawful. Justice Stevens said in the opinion of the Court that a seizure that is justified solely by the interest in issuing a warning ticket to the driver can become unlawful if it is prolonged beyond the time reasonably required to complete that mission. However, in this case was no prolonged beyond the time reasonably required to complete that mission and was over in less than 10 minutes. The Illinois Supreme Court reversed a lower court’s decision and concluded that narcotics detection dog sniff was performed without any specific and articulable facts to suggest drug activity. The Illinois Supreme Court also concluded that the use of the narcotics detection dog unjustifiably enlarged the scope of a routine traffic stop into a drug investigation. However, the United State Supreme Court disagreed with the Illinois Supreme Court because they felt that conducting a dog sniff would not change the character of a traffic stop that is lawful at its inception and otherwise executed in a reasonable manner. The Supreme Court held that any interest in possessing contraband cannot be deemed legitimate so that law enforcement conduct that only reveals the possession of contraband, compromises no legitimate privacy interest. The court also stated in its opinion that the use of a well-trained narcotics detection dog one that does not expose non-contraband items that otherwise would remain...

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