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Case Study: U.S. Hospitals And The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Ethics/Civil Rights Case Study

751 words - 4 pages

1. From the case study, provide one example of each of the forms that public policies can take: laws, rules or regulations, other implementation decisions, and judicial decisions.
When President Johnson signed thee Civil Rights Act, he passed law that included Title VI “ No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color or national origin, be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance” this provision includes hospitals, especially hospitals that are not intergraded. This changed healthcare forever, especially when Medicare was born. Medicare is a federally funded program which means a hospital that accepts Medicare must meet all the rules and regulations of Title VI of the Civil Right Act. This forced hospitals to desegregate because if they did not meet the rules and regulations of Title VI and provided admission to a patient on Medicare, the hospital would not receive a reimbursement and funds would drop. The AHA and federal authorities came together to spread the word that this decision has been made – if a Medicare patient is treated and the hospital is not compliant the hospital would not receive payment – the applied pressure worked and the number if desegregated hospitals in the south increased. Medicare worked and is successful because of the Civil Rights Act and Title VI law, and the rules/regulations that were decided by the government, as well as many others- to desegregate hospitals through Medicare.

2. From the case study, provide one example of each of the categories of health policies (allocative and regulatory)
The case study focuses heavily on the Medicare program. Medicare is an example of allocative policy because it is designed to benefit the elderly across the United States. It is a federally funded program that acts as health insurance and does good for the largest number of people. Title VI of the Civil Rights act is an example of regulatory policy it requires all hospitals to be compliant in order to receive federal funds, intended to influence decisions, behaviors, and actions for providing patient care and staff privileges.

3. Why is the Civil Rights Act a health policy as well as a civil rights policy?
The Civil Rights Act is a health policy...

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