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Change In The Power Of American Government

802 words - 3 pages

Lee MolitorisWhen the Constitution was first written during the Revolutionary war, the founding fathers did not know that different people would have different views on interpreting the Constitution. The founding fathers, such as Washington and Adams, were afraid of a central federalized power because of Great Britain. So they were for states rights. Washington did not know that other Presidents such as Jefferson, or Polk would nearly double the size of the United States, because the Constitution says that the President can do whatever he wants to, as long as it's necessary and proper, or going to war over it. There were three distinct eras in which the United States government expanded its power, to what it is today. These three eras were between 1800-1825, 1825-1840, and from 1840-1850.The governmental power changed dramatically during 1800-1825. This was considered a democratic era, due to the democratic/republican presidents during this time. One president who made the most difference in the fight for power is President Jefferson. President Jefferson bought the Louisiana Purchase from the French during his Presidency. This nearly doubled the size of the United States in land and in power. President Jefferson used his power to interpret the constitution to buy this land. It is considered necessary and proper, under the Constitution. This is one of the many hidden powers of the United States government. Know where in the Constitution, does it say that the President is allowed to nearly double the size of the United States. This is one way that the Executive branch of the government expanded its power. Another way that the government expanded its power was through Judicial Review. Judicial Review lets the judicial branch interpret the Constitution the way that they want to interpret it, giving them more power. Just as the case with Marbury verses Madison, or Mcullah verses Maryland. There are two types of judicial review, federal and state law, each giving the judicial branch of the government the power to review constitutionality for acts of congress.The governmental power changed even more so during the Democrat/Republican era, from 1825-1840. One of the Presidents that made a big difference in the change of power during this era is President Jackson. President Jackson was a democrat who is big on states rights. So during his Presidency he vetoes much congressional legislation, many of...

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