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Changing Relationship In Elie Wiesel’s Book Night

709 words - 3 pages

Relationship amongst people are meant to enhance interaction. Family relationship is the basic unit of interaction where individual learnt to socialize. But in the time of tragedy, family tend to depend each other for comfort and security. However, people may behave differently at different circumstances as some can be ruthless and takes advantage of others in the midst of horrendous predicament. Elie Wiesel’s book Night depicts the varying responses of different individuals in adversity. The book portrays the horrific experience of Elie and his father and how it significantly tested their relationship throughout the holocaust period.
At the beginning of the book, Elie mentioned that his ...view middle of the document...

Exhausted and worn out by freezing cold condition, they both watch each other’s back for protection from falling asleep which can cause them to suffer hypothermia. Even though Elie and his father was able to survive in the harsh condition of the concentration camp, other father and sons story in the book was not lucky like them. Other fathers in the story were neglected or being badly treated by their sons and regarded as hindrance to their survival. Some fathers were left dead because of weakness and disabilities which is contrary to Elie’s act of prioritizing family ties for survival.
Towards the end of their ordeal in Gleiwitz, a major shift in their relationship was evident. Elie takes the paternal role while father became reliant on Elie. His father displayed submission because of total weakness “I can’t anymore… It’s over.. I shall die right here…” (Wiesel 105). Elie was so worried of the childlike behavior of his father which slowed them in the process. For a while, crept...

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