Changing The Structure Of American Government

1186 words - 5 pages

Aligning the elections of the House, Senate, and Presidency of the United States government appears the most suitable choice in any radical amendment to the structure of our government. The aligning of elections enables our government to (eventually) change drastically, without creating drastic repercussions; the first baby step to a unicameral-parliamentary government. By aligning these elections, access points of power are not changed, but more clearly identified, gridlock should be significantly reduced, so our traditional bicameral legislature will remain, only much more efficiently. Through this slight fusion of power the institution will not necessarily change so much as shift, thus the status quo is able to be maintained without worrying American citizens that their traditional static government has been crushed in place of a foreign government. A complete change to a parliamentary government would simply be too radical and perhaps too grand an attempt at fixing something that is not necessarily bro The current system of the United states government allows the majority party to win an election, but not necessarily obtain the majority in the senate for example. This split government scenario produces, amongst other obstacles, debilitating gridlock within our legislative process. “Persistent divided government over time will likely produce a fundamental change in in the relationship between Presidents and the congress. Presidents are unable to bargain effectively with hostile congress... appeals over the heads of congress directly, and hence undermine the legitimacy of the legislative branch.”(Allen, p.136). Our government is unable to achieve anything in an efficient manner; aligning the elections will begin a process of creating a more centralized and productive government because it clearly defines the majority. By defining the majority more clearly, we not only have more focussed goals, but a more proactive way of meeting them because the majority of citizens who participated in elections ‘chose’ the final party that represents the head of state/ head of government, and congress. While the overall goal of aligning the elections is defusing the conflict and gridlock within “there is no guarantee that this proposal would alleviate the residual tension between competing branches of government” (Allen p.137) This concern, while valid, is fueled by a fear change in our institution; the change itself is significant, and progressive thus intimidating to American society. This resistance and fear is, in part, why aligning elections is an overall better choice for the United State, rather than completely switching to a unicameral parliamentary system.
Britain, for instance, one of the most stable parliamentary systems within our society does present an example for a parliamentary government in many aspects. For one, their parliamentary system creates clear access points to power with in the government. There is a much smaller breakdown of...

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