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Character Foils In Jane Eyre Essay

957 words - 4 pages

In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses characters as foils to show contrast to Jane and other minor and major characters. The entire book shows contrast, and it not only compares them to Jane but characters like Mr. Rochester. Charlotte Bronte also used foils to show complexity and diversity in many characters including Jane.
In the beginning of Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte use Georgiana reed one of Jane’s extremely privileged and wealthy cousins as the first foil. Georgiana reed was depicted as “her beauty, her pink cheeks …delight to all who looked at her (Bronte 20).” Georgiana has beautiful blue eyes with yellow ringlet hair, compared to Jane who is said to look plain and even in some cases ...view middle of the document...

” Jane knew that the social stigmas would keep her away from her love, Mr. Rochester. Both Jane and Blanche interact with people differently, Jane is respectful and when given a chance to converse with others of a high social statics makes great first impressions.
Mr. Rochester’s personality is very different from st. John’s . Mr. Rochester is romantic, rich, exciting, and he loves Jane. St. John is dull, stern, poor, spiritual and always put religion first. When it comes to Mr. Rochester and st. John everything about them are opposites, including their appearance. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, especially in Mr. Rochester’s case “I am sure most people would have thought him an ugly man (33).” In Jane’s eyes he is perfect “Most true is it that 'beauty is in the eye of the gazer.' My master's colorless, olive face, square, massive brow, broad and jetty eyebrows, deep eyes, strong features, firm, grim mouth (197).” when st. john is in a room, he stands out “your word have delineated very prettily a graceful Apollo…tall, fair, blue-eyed, and Grecian profile (511).” before both Mr. Rochester and st. John met Jane they were involved in a relationships. St. John was in love with the beautiful Rosamond Oliver, she was madly in love with st. john and so was st. john but he knew her beauty was sinful and saw that she would never make it as a missionary’s wife “that while I love rosamond Oliver so wildly…she would not make me a good wife; that she is not the partner suited to me (45).” When st. John met Jane he saw that she had a great work ethic and believe that Jane...

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