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Charles Darwin And The Impact Of His Evolution Theory

892 words - 4 pages

It was early summer in 1831 when English naturalist Charles Darwin set sail on the H.M.S. Beagle for four years to survey the Galapagos Islands and Tahiti. It is known that on this trip, Darwin would begin trying to understand how species came to be where they were living, and how they had evolved to their present condition. However, the initial interest in this trip was, by his own admission, to see an active volcano. So, how did it come to be that this exciting exploration led a young man of 22 to spend the next thirty years of his life trying to convince the world that there was more to their existence than their idea of “Creation?”
Charles Darwin was born on February 12 1809. He was ...view middle of the document...

By the time he was in his second year of medical school, Charles had starting spending more and more time in the library at Cambridge University studying the plant and animal life on display there. Growing increasingly tired of medical school, Darwin officially dropped out in the spring of 1827. This was not acceptable to his father, who reportedly, felt as if his son would become nothing more than a man of leisure, so he arranged for Charles to study for the clergy. Once again however, he did not take his studies seriously, spending a lot of time collecting insects and having dinner parties. Although, his heart was not really in his studies, he did manage to graduate from clergy school in 1831.
It was during this time that Darwin was offered a position on the H.M.S Beagle to be the ship's naturalist. The H.M.S Beagle was a ship that was chartered for scientific exploration around the world. The ship set sail on December 27 1831. For the next four years, Charles would explore a variety of different locales, ranging from the Tahitian Islands, the Cocoa Islands in the Indian Ocean and even Cape Town in South Africa. During these explorations, Darwin collected hundreds of samples and sent them back to Cambridge for his mentor Rev. Henslow to examine. These samples would include not only birds and insects, but also water and gas samples from locales such as the Andes Mountains.
One of the major discoveries to support evolution in Darwin's mind came in an area of
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