Charles Manson, Orgins Of A Madman

2510 words - 10 pages

Charles Manson is known as one of the most sinister and evil criminals of all time.He organized the murders that shocked the world and his name still strikes fear intoAmerican hearts. Manson's childhood, personality, and uncanny ability to control peopleled to the creation of a family-like cult and ultimately to the bloody murders of numerousinnocent people.Charles M. Manson was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on November 11, 1934. Hismother, Kathleen Maddox, was a teenage prostitute. Manson's father walked out on thestill pregnant Maddox, never to be seen again. In order to give her bastard son a name,Ms. Maddox married William Manson. He soon abandoned the both of them.Manson's mother often neglected Charles after her husband left her. She tried toput him into a foster home, but the arrangements fell through. As a last resort she sentCharles to school in Terre Haute, Indiana. Mrs. Manson failed to make the payments forthe school and once again Charles was sent back to his mother's abuse. At only fourteen,Manson left his mother and rented a room for himself. He supported himself with oddjobs and petty theft. His mother turned him into the juvenile authorities, who had him sentto 'Boys Town,' a juvenile detention center, near Omaha, Nebraska. Charles spent a totalof three days in 'Boys Town' before running away. He was arrested in Peoria, Illinois forrobbing a grocery store and was then sent to the Indiana Boys School in Plainfield,Indiana, where he ran away another eighteen times before he was caught and sent to theNational Training School for Boys in Washington D.C. Manson never had a place to call'home' or a real family. He spent his childhood being sent from one place to another, andtrouble always seemed to follow him. His mother's negligence left Manson without ahome and without much of a future. Manson turned to crime to support himself, and hesoon became very good at it. When just a child, he became a criminal and spent his lastyears of childhood in a correctional facility.After his release from the training school in 1954, a new period of Manson's lifebegan. He went to West Virginia and soon married a girl named Rosalie Jean Willis. Shebecame pregnant and Manson had a child. This was Manson's first real family, but hedidn't stray from the criminal lifestyle. He started stealing cars to make the moneynecessary to support his new family. By the time the baby was born, Manson was inprison on Grand Theft Auto charges.In 1958 Charles was released from prison. His wife and child had left him, leavingCharles alone once again. Several arrests for car theft and pimping followed; in 1960Charles was given ten years imprisonment for forging government checks. While he wasserving his ten year sentence at McNeil Penitentiary, he studied philosophy, took up guitar,and taught himself sing and compose songs. His newfound musical skills would laterattract followers. His study of philosophy helped create some of his outlandish ideas thatlater appealed to his...

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