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(Chaucer’s Use Of Satire In His Tales)

922 words - 4 pages

To begin, back in the days on Geoffrey Chaucer, religion was ruled by one and only one church, the Roman Catholic Church. He never really agreed with the ways of the church so he wrote a series of tales making fun of the people of England and the ways of the church. Even though he was purposely making fun of the church, he had to be careful of the way he said some things. With some of the characters he creates, Chaucer finds himself apologizing in advance for what he is about to say; or what the characters were about to say. By doing this Chaucer is using satire. Satire is when you say something but mean another or the opposite of the thing you say. Most of Chaucer’s tales are not appropriate for high schools, but of the three we read; The General Prologue, The Pardoner’s Tale, and The Wife of Bath’s Tale; Chaucer quite likes the use of satire.
First off, The General Prologue is all about introducing the characters who tell the tales on the way to Canterbury. There are twenty some characters who tell stories, but of those, only two we can read about because of the content. Even though The General Prologue is mainly introducing of the characters, Chaucer still finds a way to use satire. One of the characters he explains is the Friar. The Friar is a priest for the church; he is supposed to be a role model for the people of England, but he is the opposite. “There was a Friar, a wanton one and merry a limiter, a very festive fellow. In all Four Orders there was none so mellow, so glib with gallant phrase and well turned speech. He’d fixed up many a marriage, giving each of his young women what he could afford her.” Even though he was a high and mighty priest, he would go out and get young girls pregnant and then find them a husband. He is a not so good and holy man.
Next, The Pardoner’s Prologue and Tale still aren’t the best to be reading in a high school classroom. The Pardoner is a religious man and is part of the church. His job as the pardoned is to pardon people of their mistakes when they come to see him, but to get your sins or choices pardoned you must have money to pay the pardoner. It tells in his tale that the Pardoner’s favorite thing to preach against is greed, but what people don’t know is that he is only the...

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