Child Abuse In Canada And The United States

1075 words - 4 pages

When thinking of a child, the only thing that runs through a normal mind of a non-abuser should be thoughts of innocence, purity, and youth. Child abuse is the last thing that any child should fear, or any parent should consider. There is no way to hide the harsh differences that the world has to offer, nor is there a way to tell for sure if the children of today's society are absolutely safe from people who are into neglecting and abusing children. Of course there is no guarantee of the safety of the youth of the nation, but maybe if people were more aware of the consequences of committing such an indecent crime then there would be a lot less confusion going on. If there is not a cure then hopefully there will be a start to putting these so called criminals away for good. The issue has been around for decades and is only getting worse. Enclosed are some views and opinions on this controversial issue from "An Introduction to Child Abuse," by Duncan Lindsey focusing on The United States, and from a report called "The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect," focusing on Canada. Both articles use the Toulmin Model because they both have evidence to support what they are stating. Both articles are seeking to claim that the number of children being abused is steadily rising, and something more needs to be done. The grounds the articles used for proving their point were surveys, reports, and investigations.It is clear that child abuse has been around for quite a long time, but such a hot topic has been dormant due to the fact that the very idea did not start surfacing until the early twentieth century. Here in the United States the discovery of child abuse became known and actually documented in 1962 and in 1966, and state legislation was passed which attempted to control child abuse. Not only was child abuse becoming a familiar scene in the United States, but also The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect started a governmental-national agency to research child maltreatment. People became more aware of the issue when government agencies started. Of course, children have been abused throughout human history. Child abuse as a concept has not changed but the way people view it has. Today, legal definitions have been made and government agencies have developed an authority to remove children from their homes. Both the United States and Canada have conducted thousands of research studies on the effects of abuse, which have become programmed and embedded findings over the years. As both countries became more aware and started taking precautions and making laws, the whole world was soon informed and no longer was child abuse unknown, much less ignored. Though more and more people were informed of the matter, this did not stop the rapid growth in statistics from rising. By 1976, child abuse reports had risen to more than 669,000, and, by 1978 to 836,000. By 1992, almost three million reports of child abuse were...

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