Child Rights Essay

2856 words - 11 pages

Assembly inDecember of 1948, is one of the greatest and most challenging concernsto emerge as a worldwide issue, Yet, when one-third of the worldpopulation consists of children under eighteen years of age, the issueof Child Rights seems not only extremely important, but an issue thatneeds immediate attention. There is no way to thoroughly evaluate thevarious ways in which children around the world are economicallyexploited and physically mistreated. In Robert F. Drinan's, TheMobilization of Shame he noted, "whatever rights children have hadwere subordinated to the rights of their parents or guardians."(Drinan, p.45). The issue of human rights for children was neglectedfrom 1945 until the 1980s. This lack of attention only further provesthe greater necessity to address this issue today. The force of themovement emerged in a powerful way when a nongovernmental organization(NGO) convinced the UN to support the Convention on the Rights of theChild in 1989. This Convention, which is still relatively young,surprisingly attracted more signatures in a shorter time than anyother UN convention on human rights. Drinan pointed out the fact thatthe United States and Somalia were among those countries that failedto ratify, Somalia did not have a governing body to do so at the time.The United States does comply with many of the articles, but did notratify it due to opposition by conservative groups who believe it is'anti-family'. As of 2006, it has been ratified by 192 out of 200countries. (Nickel, p.178)UNICEF was established in 1999 and was fully dedicated to the basiceducation of children, A dire need existed as," Nearly one-fifth ofhumanity are functionally illiterate as a new millennium begins,"(Drinan, p.47) This statistic, is not only mind- blowing, buthighlights the failure of focus on the younger generations throughoutthe world. In addition, "130 million children had no access to evengain a basic education." (Drinan , p.47) Countries who struggledeconomically faced this issue head on by borrowing money from leadingand superior countries in the western area of the globe. Wheninvestigating forty of the poorest countries, Drinan mentioned howperhaps it is not the fact they do not want to afford children theseprivileges, but rather they cannot physically complete all the dutiesunder the Convention on the Rights of the Child. These countriessimply asked that they be granted forgiveness of the loans so thatthey could successfully carry out their obligations to there eighteenand under population. A number of NGOs devoted to improving this causenow grant significant resources for these children. Drinan alsotouched on the subject of child labor working in sweatshops tomanufacture consumer items. President Clinton addressed this issue andmandated a federal law for the government to purchase products onlyafter it had been verified that child labor was not used in theirproduction. Drinan additionally cited the growing concern for childsoldiers, child poverty,...

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