Christian Slave Owner's Justification Of Slavery In Harriet Jacob's "Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl" Contrasted With The Bible's Views On Slave

751 words - 3 pages

Despite the fact that Christianity teaches the values of respect, goodwill and generosity, etc., Christian slave holders seem to exclude themselves from these standards, which is indubitably hypocritical. African American slavery is reducing a human being to the condition of property, the same as other goods, wares, merchandise and chattels. The treatment of slaves was customarily lamentable because slave masters had their profit in mind rather than the well-being of their slaves. Due to the way that slavery was practiced in the South, it and Christianity cannot coexist. Those who assume that it can, and practice these two things congruently, are profoundly sanctimonious.
In Harriet Jacob’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, the violence that Linda Brent either witnessed or encountered herself was implemented by a Christian master. Throughout Linda’s life she came to acknowledge that a Christian master was the most dreadful master of all. A Christian master knew the word of God (the teachings from the Bible), so he was able to intentionally misconstrue biblical verses to his own advantage, in order to justify his savage actions and behavior toward his slaves. This evidence also gives us reason as to why the slave owners would not allow the slaves the privilege of learning to read. If a slave was able to read the Bible for themselves, they would in turn learn these same teachings. The thought of this knowledge within the slaves frightened the masters because the slaves would then know the truth about Christianity and would become aware of the deceitfulness of their owners. Christian slave owners lead lives completely opposite of that a “true Christian” should live. So called Christian slave owners should in fact not be called “Christian” at all.
Genesis 9:6 states, “Whoever sheds man’s blood, By man his blood shall be shed, For in the image of God, he made man.” In this passage we find that all men are created in the image of God. Knowing that in John 4:24, Jesus says that God is Spirit, and that in Luke 24:39, he says that Spirit does not have flesh and bones, this term cannot be an association to the physical appearance. Hence the fact that,...

Find Another Essay On Christian Slave Owner's Justification of Slavery in Harriet Jacob's "Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl" Contrasted with the Bible's Views on Slave

Slavery and Christianity in Harriet A. Jacob’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself

1780 words - 7 pages The Incongruity of Slavery and Christianity in Harriet A. Jacob’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself Slavery, the “Peculiar Institution” of the South, caused suffering among an innumerable number of human beings. Some people could argue that the life of a domestic animal would be better than being a slave; at least animals are incapable of feeling emotions. Suffering countless atrocities, including sexual assault

Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, and Harriet Ann Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

1370 words - 5 pages ://www.gutenberg.org/files/160/160-h/160-h.htm>. Jacobs, Harriet A. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Boston: Thayer & Eldridge, 1861. Documenting the American South. Library of Congress, 2003. Web. 10 Mar. 2014. . "Kate Chopin The Awakening." The Awakening, Kate Chopin, Characters, Setting, Questions. The Kate Chopin International Society, n.d. Web. 11 Mar. 2014. .

Despair in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

779 words - 3 pages Despair in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Linda Brent, Ms. Jacobs' pseudonym while writing "Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl," became so entrenched in hatred of slaveholders and slavery that she lost sight of the possible good actions of slaveholders. When she "resolved never to be conquered" (p.17), she could no longer see any positive motivations or overtures made by slaveholders. Specifically, she could not see the good

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs

1792 words - 7 pages they don't go through the same experiences as women do. In Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs does not use her real name. Instead she uses Linda Brent. By doing this Jacobs separates "life and narrative, a person and a person rendered on the page, between the experience of slavery and the conventional ways of telling the story of slavery" (497). This helps the story concentrate more on the political purpose rather then

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs

1172 words - 5 pages Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs strongly speaks to its readers by describing the brutalities of slavery and the way slave owners can destroy peaceful lives. After reading and rereading the story have noticed certain things regarding how Jacobs tries to educate her readers and her intended audience which is the women of the North. As if we do not know enough about how terrible slavery is, this story gives detailed

"Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl" by Harriet Jacobs

1047 words - 4 pages Incidents in the Life of a Slave GirlHarriet Jacobs is the author of Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. During the civil war, when she published it, Harriet had to have her character as another name, so that there was no chance of her getting caught since Dr. Flint was still after her. Before she helped any other slaves, even her self, she does every thing she can just to help her children first. Harriet knew that the only way to let slaves

Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl

1686 words - 7 pages 1861, with the aid of white abolitionist editor Lydia Maria Child, Jacobs published her narrative entitled Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl pseudonymously as "Linda Brent." Jacobs's surviving correspondence with Child validates Incidents as entirely Jacobs's work, with only minor editing on Child's part. Despite her use of a pseudonym, Jacobs did gain fame for a time after its publication. She entered into public service with her daughter

Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl

1398 words - 6 pages and contained an uncontrollable, savage sexuality. Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl brought the sexual oppression of captive black women into the public and political arena.Harriet Jacobs takes a great risk writing her trials as a house servant in the south and a fugitive in the north. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl gives a true account of the brutality slavery held for women. A perspective that was relatively secretive

Incidents in the Life of A Slave Girl

1673 words - 7 pages Jacobs' work offers a unique perspective on the complex circumstances of a black woman and a slave and a writer. The books were written to illustrate the depravity of slavery to people living in the North. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is a very powerful book that humanized the black race and exposed the evils of slavery to those in the North who were blind towards it. In the South Blacks were treated worse than animals with all the

Incidents in the life of a slave girl

970 words - 4 pages Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is a book written by Harriet Jacobs about the hardships she encountered during slavery. The book begins in a small Southern city during the 1820s where Harriet—under the name of Linda Brent in this book—was born under the iron chains of slavery, though she didn’t feel them until later in life. Her childhood was spent under kind masters and she was taught how to read and write, but the death of her last

Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl

1778 words - 7 pages In "Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl", Harriet Jacobs writes, "Slavery is terrible for men; but it is far more terrible for women" (64). Jacobs' work shows the evils of slavery as being worse in a woman's case by the gender. Jacobs elucidates the disparity between societal dictates of what the proper roles were for Nineteenth century women and the manner that slavery prevented a woman from fulfilling these roles. The book illustrates the

Similar Essays

Motherhood In Harriet Jacob's Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl

1778 words - 7 pages parental figures. Slaves never became adults; they are called boy or girl no matter what their age. They are forced into a situation where biological parents have no say over their children. The slave owners control the slaves' lives and destroy the traditional idea of motherhood and family. Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl deals with the issues of being a woman in slavery. The mothers throughout the narrative are powerless in

Harriet Jacobs' Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl

1531 words - 6 pages Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl A recurring theme in, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, is Harriet Jacobs's reflections on what slavery meant to her as well as all women in bondage. Continuously, Jacobs expresses her deep hatred of slavery, and all of its implications. She dreads such an institution so much that she sometimes regards death as a better alternative

Harriet Jacobs' Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl

1343 words - 5 pages Harriet Jacobs' Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl The feminist movement sought to gain rights for women. Many feminist during the early nineteenth century fought for the abolition of slavery around the world. The slave narrative became a powerful feminist tool in the nineteenth century. Black and white women are fictionalized and objectified in the slave narrative. White women are idealized as pure, angelic, and chaste while black

Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl And Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig

2056 words - 8 pages has to stand on her own two feet and protect her virginity from villainous men. She is often portrayed as a damsel in distress, and in the end a courageous man saves her. They get married and have a perfect happily-ever-after. In Harriet Jacobs’ slave narrative, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and Harriet Wilson’s autobiographical novel, Our Nig, both African-American authors incorporate the idea of the sentimental novel into their stories