Christianity and the Constitution Essay

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The Constitution of the United States is the spirit of America written on a piece of parchment. It is the linchpin of American life, the source of our liberty and freedom, written by some of the wisest and most courageous men ever to walk the earth; our “Founding Fathers”. Our Founding Fathers were intelligent, religious men. The Constitution is so great because it was founded upon principles and rights given by God through the Holy Bible.

“Suppose a nation in some distant Region should take the Bible

for their only law Book, and every member should regulate his

conduct by the precepts there exhibited! Every member would

be obliged in conscience, to temperance, frugality, and industry;

to justice, kindness, and charity towards his fellow men; and to

piety, love, and reverence toward Almighty god… What a

Eutopia, what a paradise that would be (Fairchild 1).”

This quote by John Adams shows that at least one of the Founding Fathers was a firm believer in Christianity and that he thought the principles of Christianity should be used in government. Adams was not alone as a Christian man in the early years of our country. Others such as Washington stated, "While we are zealously performing the duties of good citizens and soldiers, we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of religion. To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of Christian (Fairchild 1)." and Franklin who said, "Here is my Creed. I believe in one God, the Creator of the Universe. That He governs it by His Providence. That He ought to be worshipped (Fairchild 1).” were also obviously men of great faith.

The purpose of the Constitution is to establish the character of the country, to demonstrate rights and freedoms that belong to individuals in society. There are 3 main freedoms protected by the Constitution, life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. These are also shown in the Bible, in the books of Genesis, Psalms and James.

The idea of Liberty is supported by this verse “But you must never stop looking at the perfect law that sets you free. God will bless you in everything you do, if you listen and obey, and don’t just hear and forget. (Contemporary English Version, James 1.25) ” This verse is saying that by doing the will of God, you will be blessed with freedom, or liberty. This, however,...

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