Cinderella Archetypes Essay

548 words - 2 pages

A repetitive pattern in many different literary stories is widely known to many but actually recognized by few. This type of pattern is referred to as an archetype. An archetype is a complex literary term that can be found and understood by examining literature.

The first place that archetype can be examined is in Cinderella stories. The Traditional Cinderella story that we have all heard sets our standard for archetype in different cultural stories having Jewish, Indian, Chinese, and modern-day settings. In the Indian Cinderella story, "The Rough Faced Girl," there are many archetypes that are seen but the Cinderella archetype stands out. The girl, referred to as the rough faced girl, is an archetype in the Indian's cultural story. This general character, a girl wanting to gain more respect and happiness, is seen throughout different cultural stories of the Cinderella sort.

Along with characters in stories, archetypes can also be recognized in main plots or ideas in stories. The death archetype is seen in different myths throughout history, being shown in the "Coyote and the Origin of Death" and "The Origin of Death." When humans tried to find the reasoning for things, they made up myths that seemed to make sense. Different people created different myths, thus making way for the archetypal patterns. Death is in stories and poems that we have read. In "Coyote and the Origin of Death," the coyote is the trickster that makes death present in the village. In "The Origin of Death" the hare's mistake causes death to be present in today's world. The idea of the trickster in the myths of...

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