This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Civilization Versus Savagery In Golding's Lord Of The Flies

1817 words - 7 pages

"Man has demonstrated that he is master of everything - except his own nature." This quote from Henry Miller demonstrates that even the best of people can be tempted and twisted by their own nature. Like the symbolic pig’s head stuck in the calm forests clearing, all beauty and innocence can be mutated when order is overthrown by impulse actions. In William Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies, a central theme exists demonstrating the deterioration of civilization, and the overpowering of savagery, leading to the abandonment of moral thoughts and actions within a person. The beauty of the island is burned away slowly as the fiery demon of savagery attempts to overwhelm the boys. The beauty of the island symbolizes the charm of law and morals that preserve order, while the pig’s head represents the immoral and evil, and the product of actions not considered. Golding tries to convey that both savagery and civilization exists in a person, and when savagery emerges, it conquers the civilization and brings out a person’s inner impulses and animalistic qualities, rather than logic and morals.

Civilization guides order and keeps people in check with their actions, while conscience is the sense of law existing internally, making a person aware without reinforcement of wrongdoing. The idea of civilization solely exists in the novel through Ralph and Piggy, who take in the most consideration for their actions. Both civilization and conscience are equally important in keeping and maintaining order, which is why the pair of Ralph and Piggy work well together, as they stay mostly uncorrupted by the evil trait, savagery. The wholeness of Ralph’s ideas, in keeping the island like a functioning town, proves that his civil thoughts keep tensions from brewing and keep danger and death away. In the beginning of the novel, the environment is civil, as they plan out food and water schedules, and for working together to build shelter. Piggy acts as a conscience when rumors of ghost and monsters are spread, and he ends the gossip by explaining ghosts are not logical or scientific, meaning they do not exist. Piggy uses his smarts to make sundials for the boys to keep track of the time, and with Ralph’s combination of leadership, the two boys begin to form what looks like the beginnings of a civilized camp. Civilization exists in the children, as they follow Ralph’s initial commands and help build the first shelter. They don not fully understand why they act civil, but their morals passed on by parents or self growth guide them during the first portion of the book. Golding uses the combination of Ralph and Piggy to show the roots of civilization, and the peace that morals bring, and the other boys to show the balance factor of feeling obligated to act civil. They use law as a protective companion, making rules for only speaking when holding the conch, to prevent yelling and fights. Jack even shows a civil side to his mind, when first establishing their...

Find Another Essay On Civilization Versus Savagery in Golding's Lord of the Flies

The Challenge Between Civilization and Savagery in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

1501 words - 6 pages nodded. They understood only too well the liberation into savagery that the concealing paint brought" (Golding172). "You're chief, Ralph. you remember everything. I hadnt forgotten" (Golding173). In conclusion, all of the boys go through some struggle with civilization and savagery. Jack is the one who makes the biggest change in the book. He goes from civil straight to savage. William Golding's novel "Lord of the Flies", uses symbolism and

Use of Symbolism in Golding's Lord of the Flies

1322 words - 5 pages Use of Symbolism in Golding's Lord of the Flies Lord of the Flies, a suggestive name for the Devil, a devil whose name proposes that he is devoted to decay, destruction, demoralization and panic, exactly what William Golding had in mind when using symbolism in this novel. The Lord of the Flies (1954), is a novel in which interpretating the symbols are a main key to not only understanding, but also enjoying the novel. After tying many of

Symbolism in William Golding's "Lord of the Flies"

1249 words - 5 pages William Golding's "Lord of the Flies" is a parable novel that demonstrates human nature at its most primal level. Lord of the Flies tells the story of a group of British schoolboys stranded on an island as a result of an airplane crash. Because of the absence of civilization, the boys ultimately resort to barbarism. Golding communicates his belief that man's nature is evil; without the restraints of society, humans will revert to their inner

The Conch in William Golding's Lord of the Flies

2556 words - 10 pages The Conch in William Golding's Lord of the Flies In William Golding's novel “Lord of the Flies” he uses a lot of symbolism. The entire book is microcosm to the real world, as the novel is set at the time when World War II was going on and on the island there is a hunt at the end of the book symbolic of the war. A symbol Golding uses throughout the book is the conch. It represents authority and order. The person

Jack the Egomaniac in William Golding's Lord of the Flies

1281 words - 5 pages Having an individual take control over a group is inevitable. Adolf Hitler took over Germany; at first he was appointed as chancellor but the Germans’ let him get away with taking over as dictator (Truemen , 2013). It was out of fear that the Germans’ let him be in power. In Lord of the Flies, William Golding utilizes Jack as the most important character in the novel because of how his psychological personality affects the plot. Jack, much like

William Golding's The Lord of The Flies

1156 words - 5 pages In William Golding's Lord of The Flies, the boys try to maintain civility, but nature pulls them into savagery. Nature always seems to pull man in, even when man tries to fight it; the boys give in by hunting, fighting, and doing whatever they please. All of this is because there is no authority in nature. The boys try to maintain civilization on the island, but nature is gradually luring them in and revealing their true human instincts. The

William Golding's The Lord of the Flies

2034 words - 9 pages qualities of a good leader, he's intelligent, strong, and determined. I believe I posses the same qualities and, I believe I make a great leader. I believe I can closely relate my personality with that of Ralph's. The Lord of the Flies portrays two major themes, Civilization vs. Savagery and the loss of innocence. Civilization vs savagery is clearly portrayed between the protagonist, Ralph, and the antagonist, Jack. Ralph clearly stands for

Sigmund Freud's Theory in Golding's Lord of the Flies

767 words - 3 pages Woven into the work of Golding, could be found the theory of personality composed by Sigmund Freud. The structure of this theory, built by the id, the ego and the superego, all connect to the personalities of the main characters in Lord of the Flies. Approached Starting from birth, the id is one of the main components of this theory. Described in three separate parts, Freud’s theory states the component of the id being the part of

Analyzing Golding's The Lord of the Flies

1357 words - 6 pages Conforming to societal norms and following the hierarchy plays an important role in daily group dynamics that people participate in. The Robbers Cave study proved that along with the formation of these groups, ingroup hierarchy structures were formed. When certain members of this hierarchy did not live up to what was expected of them, they were replaced. This parallels Jack’s overthrow of Ralph in Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies. After Jack’s

William Golding's Lord of the Flies

1763 words - 8 pages society everyone lives in. What would happen if the people’s democracy fell and everybody is left with nothing? How would the citizens react? Would they act like they were trained to do ever since they were born, or would they disregard all of it and do as they please because there is no definite authority figure to tell them how to live. In William Golding's, The Lord of the Flies, he brilliantly tells a story of life and death and everything

William Golding's Lord of the Flies

1871 words - 7 pages William Golding's Lord of the Flies "Everything is breaking up. I don't know why." - Ralph What is going wrong on the island and why? The group of evacuees, all boys roughly aged between five and twelve, is dividing into two sets of people, each following either the ideal of civilisation, or the ideal of savagery. At the beginning of the novel, every boy, conditioned by society, was following the ideal of

Similar Essays

Perceptiveness On Civilization And Savagery Of Human Nature Reflected From William Golding's Lord Of The Flies

10966 words - 44 pages Perceptiveness on Civilization and Savagery of Human'sNature Reflected from William Golding's Lord of the FliesIntroductionLord of the Flies, one of William Golding's many novels, is a well written, well thought out writing that depicts the savagery of human nature. William Golding the man himself is qualified enough to write about such topics because he was involved heavily in W.W.II. This caused Golding's views on life to change to his current

Lord Of The Flies: Civilization Vs Savagery

947 words - 4 pages transformation from civilization to savagery in the conflict between two of the main characters: Ralph who represents law and order and Jack who represents savagery and violence. Lord of the Flies has remained a very controversial novel to this day with its startling, brutal, and truthful picture of the human nature. In the beginning, human influence was starting to affect this uninhabited “Garden of Eden”. Ralph, the charismatic and newly elected

Civilization Vs Savagery In Lord Of The Flies

1261 words - 6 pages against acts of savagery in many ways in Lord of the Flies, when determining who had the right to speak during meetings, while the group hunted pigs, throughout the fight over Piggy’s glasses, and finally with Simon’s death. When the children and the littluns crash landed onto the island, they are faced with a decision. They are given the choice whether they want to retain their civility and order or to resort to their natural animal-like

Lord Of The Flies: Jack Vs. Piggy, Savagery Vs. Civilization

1613 words - 6 pages changes show it enough for any child to crack, in the novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Jack and Piggy represent the change from civilization to savagery as they go through changes in physical appearance, personality, and morals and ethics while they are stranded on an island. Physically, Piggy’s and Jack’s appearances are very distinct and different. In the beginning of the book, Piggy is described as overweight, short, and asthmatic. He