Coastal Management Report: Collaroy Beach

1963 words - 8 pages

The Issue Coastal management is the dealings surrounding the management of development along the coastline with sustainability- being able to meet the needs of future generalizations while capitalizing the use of desired areas of the coasts for residential and commercial purposes.

My written report on coastal management will revolve around the main issue explored in our field trip which is the gradual erosion of the foredune on Collaroy beach, and its effects on stakeholders (incl. residents, developers, specialist groups). This report will also include the decision making processes considered by the management (both local and state), as well as the descriptions of their actions/strategies, and thus the results of their policies.

The LocationOur site of interest, Collaroy beach is located in the suburbs of Northern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Collaroy is part of the local government area of Warringah Council and part of the Northern Beaches region. Collaroy is well known for its excellent surf beach which joins with Narrabeen Beach in the north and Long Reef and Dee Why Beach in the south. Also in close proximity is the Dee Why Lagoon as well as the Long Reef Head.

Collaroy beach is the most highly capitalized shoreline in the Warringah local government area, featuring beachfront houses and apartments built on the edge of the sand including the famous Flight Deck Apartments.

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Geographical ProcessCoastal erosion is the loss of land along the shoreline due to the natural removal of beach and dune material in response to changing wave and water conditions. Buildings and facilities located within the 'active' beach system, or areas subject to coastal erosion can be undermined and may even collapse.

Approximately 60 percent of the NSW open coastline is characterised by sandy beaches. These beaches are dynamic environments undergoing continual cycles of erosion and accretion in response to the action of tides, wind and waves. In many places, existing foreshore development has been built within the 'active' beach system and is at risk from coastal erosion.

The extent of beach erosion during a particular storm event depends upon a variety of factors that include:•The wave conditions and elevated water levels generated by the stormThe most prominent of these processes involves waves and the currents that they generate, along with tides Waves are generated by wind blowing over a body of water and are ultimately responsible for the construction and erosion, as well as transportation of beach sediments.

Waves are classified into two groups: swell waves or sea waves. The incoming tide of a wave is called a swash while the outgoing tide is called a backwash.

Swell waves are more powerful and cause...

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