Cognitive Behavior Therapy For PTSD Essay

2607 words - 10 pages ✓ Expert Reviewed
VIEW DOCUMENT
Preview

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Based Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: Cognitive Processing Therapy Approach
What do you do when you experience a life threatening, traumatic event, and months later you are still experiencing the same frightening responses? Individuals who experience trauma are often forced to face their problems long after the event has happened. The first step to dealing with this issue would be to seek professional help as soon as possible so that they may be properly diagnosed and receive accurate treatment to overcome the intrusive symptoms. An individual who is suffering from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have experienced, witnessed, or was affected by a life threatening event. These individuals experience persistent responses that affect their lives drastically. They are constantly overwhelmed and cannot move on from persistent painful memories. They are in a terrifying state where they feel a constant sense of danger. This paper examines Cognitive Behavior Therapy’s (CBT) various Psychological Treatments for PTSD, specifically examining the effects of the Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) approach and its effects on controlling or reducing stressing and intrusive symptoms of PTSD to receive desired outcomes.
According to the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV-TR), individuals diagnosed with PTSD have to be exposed to an actual traumatic or life threatening event in which they experienced, witnessed, or was confronted with an event that could have caused serious injury or threatened the integrity of self or others, which initiated an intense response of agitated behavior, horror, or fear, (2000). Traumatic events include and are not limited to: natural disasters, terrorist attacks, war, rape, assault, sexual or physical abuse, vehicular accidents, victimization, childhood neglect/abuse, kidnapping, and unexpected deaths. Individuals with PTSD persistently re-experience their traumatic event in their thoughts, perceptions, imagery, dreams, illusions, hallucinations, and flashbacks. They may experience intense physiological distress or reactivity to cues of the traumatic event. These individuals persistently avoid any stimuli associated with the traumatic event and use other mechanisms to cope with any situation or cue that recalls or contradicts their emotional or cognitive responses to the traumatic event (American Psychiatric Association [DSM-IV-TR], 2000). Individuals with PTSD also experience persistent symptoms of increased arousal, such as irritability and difficulty concentrating. These disturbances can cause significant distress in social life, the work place, and family systems. According to the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV-TR), in order for individuals to be diagnosed with PTSD they must experience disturbances and symptoms for more than one month (2000). Symptoms can be specified as acute (less than 3 months), chronic (3 months or...

Find Another Essay On Cognitive Behavior Therapy For PTSD

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Group For Eating Disorders

2339 words - 9 pages adolescents: A case series. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 15(4), 415-425. doi:http://dx.doi.org.library3.webster.edu/10.1016/j.cbpra.2008.04.001 Telch, C. F., Agras, W. S., & Linehan, M. M. (2001). Dialectical behavior therapy for binge eating disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69, 1061-1065. doi:10.1037//0022-006X.69.6.1061 ...

Individual Centered Therapy And Cognitive Behavioral Treatment For Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

1212 words - 5 pages know that they are loved unconditionally. “By acceptance I mean a warm regard for him as a person of unconditional self- worth- of value no matter what his condition, his behavior, or his feelings (Rogers, 1961).” Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) addresses maladaptive thinking and feelings in individuals. It was originally developed to treat depression and anxiety but is now used for many different disorders. It is a very effective type of...

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

2261 words - 9 pages PTSD. Treatments for PTSD Some treatments that had proven effective with post-traumatic stress disorders are psychotherapy, medication, or sometimes both. By far the most effective treatment for PTSD is the cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). There are numerous counseling techniques in cognitive behavior therapies that are specifically focus on PTSD symptoms, such as prolonged exposure, stress inoculation training, cognitive therapy, and...

PTSD

1387 words - 6 pages . Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder is possible. The current treatment of PTSD encompasses several types of psychotherapy combined with a medication regimen. Cognitive therapy is one type of therapy used to combat PTSD. The goal of cognitive therapy is to allow the patient to slowly experience feelings, thoughts, and events associated with the trauma in a controlled setting. This allows the PTSD sufferer, to categorize the traumatic feelings...

Paper 2

1182 words - 5 pages mainly intended to help weaken acute symptoms associated with the disorder (Matsakis & Tilley, 1994). Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a treatment that consists of approaches that are focused on the observable behavior as well as the thinking or beliefs that accompany the behavior. For example, these approaches include relaxation training, distraction techniques, biofeedback, cognitive restructuring and social skills training. Basically, it...

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

1453 words - 6 pages to help him or her work through the trauma. Studies have also shown that medications help ease associated symptoms of depression and anxiety and help with sleep. The most widely used drug treatments for PTSD are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as Prozac and Zoloft. At present, cognitive-behavioral therapy appears to be somewhat more effective than drug therapy. However, it would be premature to conclude that drug therapy is less...

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies For Posttraumatic Stress Condition

1546 words - 6 pages Therapy The treatment components of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) that are typically utilized in the treatment for PTSD include psychoeducation, prolonged exposure and/or in vivo exposure, cognitive restructuring, and anxiety management (Harvey, Bryant, & Tarrier, 2003). Psychoeducation Psychoeducation includes providing the client with information about the common symptomology that may be experienced following a traumatic event. This...

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: The War Within

1455 words - 6 pages victim as a scapegoat and defending his emotions. Degradation trauma is usually found in rape victims. Obviously a feeling of being degraded is the main factor here. We now have a cause and a reaction, but what do we do next. There has to be a way for a PTSD patient to get help.Treatment for PTSD comes in four ways. They are group therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, two different cognitive-behavioral approaches of exposure therapy and...

EMDR Therapy in Combat-Related PTSD

1988 words - 8 pages soldiers about seeking treatment for PTSD symptoms, many of those that are indeed affected have not been diagnosed (Bastien, 2010). Exposure therapy, which is a cognitive behavioral approach, currently is considered one of the most effective treatments available (Cukor et al., 2009). Rizzo et al., (2010) talks about one such example of exposure therapy is Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET). The object of VRET is to create multi-sensory...

Relationship Violence Among Veterans

3051 words - 12 pages . The study addresses the usefulness of cognitive processing therapy for abuse, however, an examination of the diversity of risk factors are needed to understand the complexity of abuse perpetration from PTSD veterans. Article: Marital relations among former prisoners of war: Contribution of posttraumatic stress disorder, aggression, and sexual satisfaction This study interconnected with the other studies with empirical data that proves PTSD is...

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

2829 words - 11 pages choose the life they want to live since they are in control of their own behavior. Therefore, it is up to a person to work out a therapy plan for this/her PTSD. With this approach it is imperative to have a therapeutic relationship. It is of vast importance that the client feels secure and in touch with the therapist; Epstein, 1989 (Wilcock, 1996, para23). Additionally important is the counselor having complete confidence that the client can be...

Other Cognitive Behavior Therapy For PTSD Essays

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Essay

2153 words - 9 pages Cognitive Behavior Therapy Cognitive Behavior Therapy for body image has been proven an effective way to improve body dissatisfaction. It has been applied to persons with eating disorders, obesity, body dysmorphic disorder, and normal weight, all of whom harbor negative feelings toward their bodies. It is critically important to target body image for specific treatment, as negative feelings about one's body are often a major precipitous...

Insomnia And Cognitive Behavior Therapy Essay

2574 words - 10 pages , chronic pain and insomnia. The most noteworthy aspect of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for insomnia is that it in fact treats the cause of the insomnia itself and not just the indications as medication does. Additionally, CBT can be united with medication administration for patients who need quick relief or to help primarily break a pattern of insomnia. CBT works because the main cause of insomnia is over stimulation or a too active awake...

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) Within Social Psychology

2014 words - 8 pages the Behavior Therapy, which followed a social learning theory (Bandura, 1986). Whereas, Cognitive Therapy followed an information-processing model (Goldfried, 2003). Behavior Therapy was based upon classical conditioning and a simple stimulus-response model (Goldfried, 2003). After the addition of cognition to Behavior Therapy, CBT, the premise for humans followed a stimulus-organism-response-consequence (S-O-R-C) model. Hence, the organism in...

Comparison of Drug Courts or Cognitive Behavior Therapy to Battle Cocaine Addiction

1826 words - 7 pages There are thousands of people in the United States that are addicted to cocaine and are left untreated. Many of them are at risk of severe health problems. I am conducting this research paper to compare and contrast the differences between the effectiveness of drug courts and cognitive behavioral therapy for cocaine addicts. We know that all people respond differently to therapy than others do, but it is good to be able to find the...