Cognitive Theory Of Dreams Essay

823 words - 3 pages

IntroductionDreams can be mysterious, but understanding the meaning of our dreams can be downright puzzling. The content of our dreams can shift suddenly, feature bizarre elements or frighten us with terrifying imagery. The fact that dreams can be so rich and compelling is what causes many to believe that there must be some meaning to our dreams.While many theories exist to explain why we dream, no one yet fully understands their purpose, let alone how to interpret the meaning of dreams. So hopefully within this research you will understand what most psychologist theory stated.Who is Calvin S. Hall?Calvin S. Hall was an American psychologist whose field of studying was in dream interpretation and analysis. He began his research of dreams in the 1940's in which he also wrote many books; such as, "The Primer of Freudian" and "The Primer of Jungian Psychology" best known. He was born in Seattle, Washington. He first studied psychology at the University of Washington as an Undergraduate, working with a behaviorist Edwin Guthrie. In 1961 to 1965 He studied at his institute of Dream research in Miami and established the similarity in dream, throughout the night by studying dreams collected in the dream laboratory. During this time him and Robert Van de Castle developed and understanding coding system that changes the objective study of dreams. In his work he showed that dreams between people across the world are more similar than they are different.What was Calvin's Theory?In 1953, Mr. Hall developed a cognitive theory of dreams. This theory is saying that dreams express conceptions of self, family members, friends, and social environment. Mr. Hall believed and argued that "a dream was simply a thought or sequence of thoughts that occurred during sleep and that image are visual representation of personal conceptions." In other words, "dreams reflect the dreamer unconscious self-concept which often does not at all resemble our distorted self-portraits", by which we tend to fool ourselves in waking life.What are Dreams?For a period of time in my life I've thought that dreams were an opening to a different realm that I seek to know about. But within research I have found out that with in modern times dreams have been seen as a connection to the unconscious mind. Dreams are a succession of images, ideas, emotions, and sensations that subconsciously in the mind during certain stages of sleep. The content and purpose of dreams are not really understood, though they have been a topic of scientific speculation and a subject of religious interest throughout...

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