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Colorectal Cancer In African Americans Essay

845 words - 4 pages

According to the American Cancer Society, the third leading cause of cancer related deaths for African American men and women is colorectal cancer (CRC). African Americans have a higher CRC mortality rate than White men and women due to lack of preventative testing, increased cancer fatalism attitudes, decreased knowledge of the cancer, and late onset diagnosing. To research how to resolve this issue the “Fayetteville Area Inter-Faith Commitment to Colorectal Health and Cancer Reduction in African Americans,” or “The F.A.I.T.H Project” was created to execute a culturally targeted faith/community-based educational intervention about CRC within the African American community.
The sample included 539 participants belonging to community-based organizations and Black churches. The criteria an individual had to meet to partake in this experiment included; African American that was 50 years of age or older, a resident within the Fayetteville/Cumberland county, willing to participate in both the faith/community-based educational program and the telephone follow-up interview to discuss their screening, and able to provide both verbal and written consent. Ultimately, the participants were assigned into two groups, an immediate intervention group or a delayed control group. While the control group did not receive the educational program initially, they were invited to receive it three months later. The participants were asked to fill out pre-test questionnaires in order to obtain personal and medical demographic information, as well as to evaluate their knowledge about colorectal cancer, whether or not they had screening in the past, and cancer fatalism attitudes. This same test was given to participants after the experiment as well.
The experiment itself allowed voluntary participation in the experiment and people were allowed to depart at any given time. The project team members included social workers, nurses, ministers, graduate and undergraduate students, a statistician and physicians. The pre-intervention of immediate intervention group took place at either a church or community-based organization. This is where the project was explained and pre-test questionnaires were filled out. The intervention itself was titled “FAITH IN ACTION” and was based on principles from the Bible and included story-telling, open discussion, educational materials relevant to the culture, and components of spirituality and religion. The participants were given colorectal fact sheets and Colorectal Cancer Resource Kits that included a seven-minute video, which they watched then followed with a ten-minute question and answer session. The post intervention included post-test questionnaires, a stamped pre-addressed post card to give to their physician validating CRC...

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