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Coming Of Age Theme In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

781 words - 4 pages

Patrick Rothfuss, author of award winning novel, The Name of the Wind, once noted, “When we are children we seldom think of the future. This innocence leaves us free to enjoy ourselves as few adults can. The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind.” Such is the case for Scout Finch, Harper Lee’s protagonist in To Kill a Mockingbird. In the exposition of the novel, Scout is an immature and nonchalant six-year old who believes her neighbor, Boo Radley, is a malevolent phantom. Jem’s reaction to the Tom Robinson trial helps Scout to understand many life concepts. Once Boo Radley reveals himself, she sees him as Boo: the human being, and not Boo: the malevolent ...view middle of the document...

One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough." Evidently, she matured even more and took Atticus’ advice.
Likewise, Lee’s theme is further explored when Scout learns of why Jem is so sensitive about the trial. His loss of innocence and incipiently found cognizance leads her to her own coming of age. When Scout wants to squash a roly-poly, Jem teaches her an important lesson, “'Why couldn't I mash him?' I asked. 'Because they don't bother you,' Jem answered in the darkness. He had turned out his reading light." On that day, she learned the paramountcy of the phrase ‘it is a sin to kill a mockingbird’ as Jem had from the trial. As the story progresses, Boo brings Jem to Atticus and sits with Scout on the porch. As Tate and Atticus converse, Tate insists that Ewell fell on his knife, and Scout kens that if they verbally express that Boo stabbed Ewell, it would magnetize unwanted publicity. Tate verbalizes, “"'To my way of thinkin', Mr. Finch, taking the one man who's done you and this town a great service...

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