Comment On William Wordsworth's Portrayal Of Nature And His Treatment Of It

788 words - 3 pages

Wordsworth's poems initiated the Romantic era by emphasizing feeling, instinct, and subjectivity above formality and mannerism. The themes that run through Wordsworth's poetry, and the language and imagery he uses to embody those themes, remain remarkably consistent throughout, adhering largely to the tenets Wordsworth set out for himself. Wordsworth argues that poetry should be written in the natural language of common speech, rather than in the lofty and elaborate dictions He argues that poetry should offer access to the "emotions recollected in tranquillity". Nature plays a vital role in the creation of Wordsworth's poetry. Nature acts as Wordsworth's muse.Wordsworth was a pantheist, he believed that everything is a manifestation of Nature and that God existed in Nature. For Wordsworth, Nature acted as a philosopher, guide, friend and mentor. This has clearly been seen in "The Nutting" and "From the Prelude". In the Nutting , he is drawing upon an incident which took place during his childhood where he is awe of the external appearance of nature and wants to destroy it. As soon as he performs this gruesome act, he is overcome by a new realisation at the sense of pain of his destruction of Nature. There is a feeling of repentance and regret after he destroys the once untouched scene. His consciousness is aroused by Nature and he is awakened by the spirituality in the woods. In his poem From the Prelude, he recalls another childhood experience where he steals a boat. As he quietly sails through the water, there is a sense of pride and excitement. But, when he approaches a crag that appeared to stride after him like a living thing, feeling of fear and guilt are aroused within him. The crag, which is described as "huge" and "black", intimidates him, it is a part of Nature and it was a manifestation of his guilt. It seems as if Nature had a moral and spiritual presence, which was working on his mind, teaching him and guiding him, as a teacher would have done.Nature is treated as an entity in her own right; she has a soul, life and a being of her own in Wordsworth's poems. Nature is not merely used as a scenic and picturesque background but it has a separate existence of her own. William Wordsworth's...

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