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Commercial Expansion Of The Victorian Era

842 words - 4 pages

The Victorian Era began on June 20, 1837 when Queen Victoria was coronated as the monarch of the Great Britain. This marked the beginning of a great and prosperous era for Great Britain: The Victorian Era. The commercial expansion in Great Britain vastly grew because of a number of factors. The creation of factories greatly sped up the production of cheap and standardized goods. The colonization of foreign lands allowed different goods be imported to Great Britain, which expanded the economy and the amount of industries involved in it. The enlargement of different industries within the British economy allowed the economy to grow and expand. Commercial expansion during the Victorian Era was ...view middle of the document...

Later, once the British had defeated Napoleon, who fought alongside Spain, Britain gained several colonies from both countries in South Africa, present day Sri Lanka, Trinidad and several other Caribbean islands. This further broadened the size of Great Britain’s economy, as well as the amount and variety of exotic goods that became part of its economy.
During the reign of Queen Victoria, several industries, such as the mining and the textile industries, were expanded and revitalized. The creation of factories greatly increased the amount of items that could be created, and as a result created more jobs for the British people and provided the ability to mass produce goods. This also enlarged the industries in which the goods come from. The textile industry, which was a massive sector of the British economy, grew at unprecedented rates because of new inventions, and as a result lead to large exports of textiles, such as cotton, silk and leather, around the empire, as well as significant amounts of jobs for the people of Great Britain. The mining industry took off as well because of new steam powered machines that could aid in getting the coal and other raw materials, as well as a large amount of women and children who began working in this industry. In the mining industry, woman and children were primarily employed to push the coal carts from the mine to different locations. The ship building industry also took off because of new innovations in steam and propeller power. This industry, which primarily...

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