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Communism In The U.S. Essay

1018 words - 4 pages

Karl Marx, author of The Communist Manifesto and Das Kapital, was the originator of the political and economic theory of Scientific Socialism (modern Communism). Communism, by definition, is the complete control of major resources and the means of production by government, initially in the form of autocracy. In theory, under this system all would be equal; all would share in both work, according to their ability, and profit, according to need. According to Marx, the proletariat, or working class, would revolt against the bourgeoisie, or wealthy capitalist class, because of the stark contrast prevalent between the wealthy and poor. The new economy, run by and for the people, would produce not for profit, but for the needs of the people. Thus, abundance would rule. Marx further predicted this revolution would occur in Western Europe, the most industrialized and capitalist portion of the world.
     During the late 1920’s up until World War II, the United States went through a period of severe economic depression, also called the “Great Depression”. Multitudes of Americans everywhere were inadequately clothed, nourished, and sheltered. As hunger and unemployment reached never before seen levels, despair reigned. During these times Labor Union enrollment dramatically increased and Americans were searching for a panacea to their social and economic problems. It was at this time that groups of citizens, jobless and hungry, looked upon Communism favorably. These individuals longed for what seemed to be a utopian society, which they viewed in the USSR, where everyone was employed and cared for. Communist political parties sprung up everywhere, literature and newspapers in support of Communism proliferated. More and more, seeing the success and the promises, the enrollment in Communist parties increased. Members of the American Communist party idealized the leaders of the USSR, Lenin and Stalin.
     American politician Joseph McCarthy led a campaign against Communist subversion in the early 1950’s. McCarthy charged several high-ranking officials with subversive activities. Then, as chairman of the Senate subcommittee on investigations, McCarthy continued inquiry into subversive activities in the U.S. He created much controversy with his allegations, which were more like a modern day political “witch hunt”. Americans, deeply worried about the spread of communism, panicked with the highly publicized hearings. People were fired from jobs and had themselves and family members physically threatened if they were unfortunate enough to be accused of supporting Communism. There was a nationwide “Red Scare”.
     After the death of USSR leader Joseph Stalin, reports were made about his method for controlling his country. The Khrushchev Reports, as they were called, revealed the brutal tactics that Stalin used in marshaling resources to accomplish his objectives. If discord was detected,...

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