Dystopia Society In The Handmaid´S Tale By Margaret Atwood

1288 words - 6 pages

In Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood writes about a dystopia society. Atwood used situations that were happening during the time she began writing her novel, for example, women’s rights, politics, and in religious aspects. Atwood’s novel is relevant to contemporary society. There are similarities between Atwood’s novel and our society today, which lends to the possibility that our modern society might be headed to a less intense version of this dystopia society.
In the novel Atwood writes how Offred the main character transitions from her life before to a Handmaid. Offred wasn’t her real name but the name that was given to her when the Gilead society formed. Prior to the Gilead forming Offred lived with her husband and daughter. Offred and her husband worked and had social lives. Offred didn’t realize what was happening at the time the Gilead was forming, her bank account was frozen and only the men had access to the accounts; the women were fired from their jobs. Offred husband was shot, her daughter was taken away, and she was imprisoned to be re-educated as a handmaid. Just like us we live our lives day to day: get up, go to work, take care of the kids, husbands, and have a social life. We tend to lose sight of what is going on in our government, call it ignorance, not all of us but majority of us are unaware what is happening in our government; like Offred being willed ignorant to any impulse to resist the increasingly repressive actions leading up to the coup that started Gilead. We too ignore the actions that are or have happened in our society, for example, our health insurance issues that are going on now. Many of us do not know what it’s really about; we accept what is told to us and chose to trust the ones telling it to us to be the truth, instead of informing ourselves on what it actually is about and what we vote for.
Another similarity between Atwood’s novel and our society today is the repressive rules for the women. In Pakistan women have little to no rights. The policies that the Gilead in The Handmaid’s Tale is similar to the rules Pakistan have for their women. In the Gilead society the handmaids have to cover up their bodies, wear long dresses, and cover their faces with vial’s and wings. These rules for the women are the same if not similar in Afghanistan, India, and some south Asian countries. In Pakistan women can be raped and if no evidence is found to prove it was rape the men could get away with it and the women could be charged with pre-marital sex and sentence to prison. This is similar in The Handmaid’s Tale; the handmaids go through “the ceremony” as they call it. The handmaids had to lay on their backs once a month in hope to become impregnated by the commander. The handmaids are valued only for their womb, ovaries, and reproducing. If their ovaries were no good or if they couldn’t have children for any other reason, then the handmaid was not valued or not needed and was sent to “the club”...

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