This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Compare And Contrast Irving's Rip Van Winkle Washington Irving's Diction

837 words - 3 pages

In his story of the Rip Van Winkle, Irving used his unique style of diction, which also developed a contrast between before and after the climax of the story. The major change of scene in the story takes place after Rip takes his nap in the mountains and there is a noteworthy change of Irving's diction from this point onwards. In his description of the surrounding nature and the weather, a distinct contrast exists between the duration of twenty years.The Kaatskill Mountain is the first feature to be introduced to the setting of the story. It is said that this branch of the Appalachian can be seen "swelling up to a noble height and lording it over the surrounding country." The description of the mountain as having a height of noble status indicates Irving's elaborate modification of the surroundings in the beginning of the story. The fact that the mountain is depicted as lording over the country gives it a majestic sense to the nature. In relation to the weather, the mountain is portrayed as having the quality of "magical hues" of blue and purple. The use of purple brings forward the idea of a majestic color and we can see that it was, by no means, a coincidence that this particular color was used to describe the mountain. He also described the image of the mountain peak at sunset, "in the last rays of the setting sun, will glow and light up like a crown of glory." However, as the period of twenty years pass and Rip wakes up from his nap, Irving no longer uses his regal diction and instead, introduces a much more unadorned and civilized forms. His reference to the mountain lacks the style he was involved in previously. The change in Irving's diction is an indication of how America, the country which was once under the rule of England, has developed into a country that sought Independence. The majestic elaboration refers to the royal power of England which disappears after Rip's nap, along with Irving's diction.After his countenance with the stranger with the grizzled beard, Rip follows his trail past the ravine and comes to a hollow that is similar to a little amphitheater. In his description of the amphitheatre, "surrounded by perpendicular precipices, over the brinks of which impending trees shot their branches, so that you only caught glimpses of the azure sky and the bright evening cloud." Irving shows a clear and bold sketch of the...

Find Another Essay On Compare and contrast Irving's Rip Van Winkle -Washington Irving's Diction

Compare and Contrast Walter Mitty with Rip Van Winkle

867 words - 3 pages dreams which undertake him spontaneously as he feuds with his nagging wife. In a very similar short story, "Rip Van Winkle" by Washington Irving, the main character Rip Van Winkle slips away from his domestic problems with his wife to a place of serenity where he can sleep in the peace and quiet of the Catskill Mountains. These two stories possess many striking similarities yet there are many differences between them which make them

Rip Van Winkle Washington Irving Essay

1143 words - 5 pages . Catalano, Susan. "Henpecked to Heroism: Placing Rip Van WInkle and Francis Macomber In the American Renegade Tradition." Hemingway Review 17.2 (1998): 111-117. Web. Ferguson, Robert A. "Rip Van Winkle and the Generational Divide in American Culture." Early American Literature (2006): 529-544. Web. Irving, Washington. The Norton Anthology American Literature. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc, 2013. Print. Wyman, Sarah. "Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle: A Dangerous Critique of a New Nation." ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes, and Reviews Vol 23 no 4 (2010): 216-222. Web.

Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving

970 words - 4 pages Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving When superficially read, Washington Irving's short story "Rip Van Winkle" seems to be a simple tale of an unhappily married man whose happy-go-lucky, carefree attitude gains him loving adoration from the village women, children, and dogs; but only scorn from his wretched wife. However, when read more closely, the story takes on an entirely different meaning. Through his constant references to Dame Van

Washington Irving's Writtings

1021 words - 5 pages of a series of short stories in Washington Irving’s The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent (Irving, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow). It was published in 1820 along with Rip Can Winkle. The story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is a tale of Ichabod Crane and Brom Bones who fight for a wealthy farmer’s daughter, Katrina, and her hand in marriage. Ichabod also loves food and marrying Katrina makes it well known he will be well taken care of financially

Washington Irving's The Devil and Tom Walker

1086 words - 4 pages There have been numerous stories, tunes, movies, and craft depicting the exemplary story of man vs. the fallen angel. The old German legend of "Faust," which is accepted to be the primary impact in Washington Irving's "The Devil and Tom Walker", was utilized as a lesson to alarm individuals from wrongdoing. On the other hand, Washington utilized the general subject of bartering with the villain for a lavishly typical and captivating story with

Rip Van Winkle

2570 words - 10 pages "The outline for each story, although based on native history, can be found in legend and myth." Robert M. Meyers, a famous critic, said this about Washington Irving's amazing talent in writing short stories in literature. "Rip Van Winkle" is one of Washington's most famous short stories. Washington does a fantastic job in the story using the themes of martial conflict and American Revolution. Throughout the story, both seem very noticeable

Rip Van Winkle

1059 words - 5 pages "Rip Van Winkle" is undoubtedly Washington Irving's chef-d'œuvre, and this story of a man who falls asleep for twenty years seems to escape the law of time, as it haunts us still with its mystery. Once the reader realizes that Rip sleeps precisely through the American Revolution, the story begins to bristle with cultural overlaps and cultural conflicts occur between what was and what is. Through the vivid picture of Rip Van Winkle, an

Rip Van WInkle Revision

811 words - 3 pages Quinn O'MalleyProfessor. RippeonRip Van Winkle10/27/14The Husband who couldn't Handle ItIrving's use of literary techniques in Rip Van Winkle brings the story to life as they draw the reader into the plot and allow the reader to begin to fully understand Rip's true nature. This insight into the mind of Rip Van Winkle allows the reader to begin to empathize with Rip's domestic troubles. Only once the reader fully comprehends Rip's mental state

Character And Theme In Rip Van Winkle

981 words - 4 pages In Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," Rip's character is closely correlated with the theme of nature and its prominence over the ever-changing world. The story is set in the Kaatskill Mountains, an important setting with a luminance that does not falter throughout. Similarly, Rip is immediately described as a respectable and well liked man in his mountainous setting. Right off the bat, the two can be easily associated. The magical

Washington Irving´s Rip Van Winkle vs. The Revolutionary War

675 words - 3 pages They say “don’t judge a book by its cover.” This is implying that there is more to something than meets the eye. This is the same case with Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle.” You have to read between the lines of the short story to understand the passion and meaning that Irving has so, intelligently, woven into his story. In the beginning of the story Irving talks of how Dame Van Winkle would basically nag her husband to death. He never

Confusion and Personal Identity in Rip Van Winkle

1037 words - 4 pages felt "...fain to draw off his forces and take to the outside of the house-the only side which, in truth, belongs to a henpecked husband." Throughout the text, and in this passage in particular, Irving's word choice offers an excellent descriptive portrait of the events concerning and happening to Rip Van Winkle. At first glance, we read the passage and understand Rip's confusion, but when we examine the words we are given a new insight into

Similar Essays

Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle" Essay

913 words - 4 pages Washington Irving was an American author, short story writer, essayist, poet, travel book writer, biographer, and columnist. Irving has been called the father of the American short story. He is best known for "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow", in which the schoolmaster Ichabold Crane meets with a headless horseman, and "Rip Van Winkle. Washington Irving's life is in the beginning of national experience. His life is basically the light of the

Rip's Character And Symbolism In Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle

900 words - 4 pages Rip's Character and Symbolism in Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle "Rip Van Winkle" has been a well-known story told throughout time. There is not a doubt that as a child, many of you heard the words of Washington Irving's famous tale of the man who slept for twenty years. Nor can one forget the "elves" that Rip Van Winkle spent the night with in the amphitheater. Like many stories, Irving's "Rip Van Winkle" has been told so many

Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle Shapes American Culture

1672 words - 7 pages Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle Shapes American Culture "Darkness...lowers upon my mind, and the times are so hard they sicken my soul," says Washington Irving in a letter to a friend (Letters 446). This statement reveals Irving's intense emotional condition, and in many ways indicates the intense social atmosphere as well as his personal conflicts, during the composition of The Sketch Book. Upon the bankruptcy of his family's

Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle" : 'the Mountain Episode'

1085 words - 4 pages Scot who helpfully directed Irvings attention to the wealth of unused literary material in German Folktales. This is where Irving found the source for 'Rip van Winkle'.Before the real story begins, Irving introduces Diedrich Knickebocker; an old gentleman of New York, who was very curious in the Dutch history of the province, and the manners of the descendants from it's primitive settlers.Diedrich Knickebocker was one of Irvings pseudonyms, and