This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Compare And Contrast The Attitudes Of Andrew Carnegie, Eugene V. Debs And Booker T. Washington Towards The New Wealth Created In America During The Late Nineteenth Century Bibliography Included!

1415 words - 6 pages

The late nineteenth century was a period of rapid industrialization and extreme economical expansion and wealth for America. Many businessmen such as J.P. Morgan, John D. Rockefeller and Cornelius Vanderbilt among others reached the pinnacle of wealth and amassed huge amounts of money. Many individuals developed contrasting attitudes and views on this newly created wealth. Among these individuals were Andrew Carnegie, Eugene V. Debs, and Booker T. Washington. Seemingly similar people, and yet they were almost completely different. One was a well-known philanthropist who was one of the richest men in world, another was an educator and an advocate of Black advancement and the last a socialist and labor activist (Encarta). Their attitudes on the wealth of America during the late nineteenth century may have looked different, since they seemed to be completely different people and with different attitudes on wealth. But in reality, all of these three men's attitudes toward the wealth created in America during the late nineteenth century were exactly the same: they all believed that this huge, new wealth should be redistributed back into society's most needy areas.Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) was one of the most famous American philanthropists and industrialists (Encarta). He was a Scottish immigrant who had worked his way up from "rags to riches" in the railroad and steel industry. And by 1901, he was one of the richest men in the World and one of the few men who actually achieved the American ideal of "rags to riches" (Brinkley, Alan, et al 518). He amassed a huge fortune in the steel industry and in 1901 simply quit the business life and lived the rest of his life as a philanthropist. Following the principles laid down in his book, The Gospel of Wealth, Carnegie donated over $300 million back to society, primarily through foundations and trusts. In this book, he believed that "People of wealth should consider all revenues in excess of their own needs as "trust funds" that they should administer for the good of the community, the person of wealth was "the mere trustee and agent for his poorer brethren," (Brinkley, Alan, et al 523). But he didn't believe in simply donating charity to the poor and needy, fearing they would become dependent on it. He wanted to have this money fund primarily libraries, so that the poor could help themselves, exactly the way he had done. He believed all excess money was simply a blessing and an entrustment from the public that was to be redistributed back into society and in a way that would better it (Brinkley, Alan, et al 523). The Carnegie Corporation sums up Andrew Carnegie's beliefs, "Many persons of wealth have contributed to charity, but Carnegie was perhaps the first to state publicly that the rich have a moral obligation to give away their fortunes."But to achieve this amazing wealth, Andrew Carnegie employed ruthless tactics as a businessmen. But his wealth was a double-edged sword in that "what he had done to...

Find Another Essay On Compare and Contrast the Attitudes of Andrew Carnegie, Eugene V. Debs and Booker T. Washington Towards the New Wealth Created in America During the Late Nineteenth Century - Bibliography Included!

Describe Law and Order in the Late Nineteenth Century

1355 words - 5 pages considered unusual otherwise. The jury had to discuss their decision of the case in the same room; this meant the criminals were able to identify who saw them guilty.In conclusion, the police were a major beneficial part of the late nineteenth century. I think it was a good system to enforce as it was further development towards the system we hold today. It was effective in some situations but not all. Many people didn't accept them as they were seen to be biased in the people they helped. Although the appearance of police officers didn't complement them and led people to wonder what their objective was, they had good intentions at heart...hopefully.

Eugene V. Debs Essay

2783 words - 11 pages that, however, there is no question that the Espionage Act abridged on his First Amendment rights. Had the circumstances been different, if it was peacetime, if there was no 'Red Scare', there is no question that Eugene Debs would not have been prosecuted. In the case of Schenck v. United States, which set precedent for the Debs case, Judge Oliver Wendell Holmes stated that were the U.S. not at war, the rights of Charles T. Schenck and other

eugene v. Debs

2046 words - 8 pages Eugene V. Debs Citizen and Socialist Nick Salvatore’s book Eugene V. Debs Citizen and Socialist provides a very detailed account of the life and times and Eugene Debs. Debs was born in Terre Haute Indiana and Salvatore emphasizes the important role that this played in Debs upbringing. Terre Haute was ripe with religious fundamentalism from its founding. Religion permeated everyday life throughout Terre Haute. Salvatore writes that, “In

The Influence of Nineteenth Century Realism and Naturalism in America

1412 words - 6 pages realistic movement of the late nineteenth century saw authors accurately depict life and it's issues. Realists tried to "give a comprehensive image of contemporary life" (Elliott 502) by presenting the complete image. Realists created this image of America by combining a good sort of "details derived from observation and documentation" to "approach the norm of Hernandez 2 expertise..". together with this system

Comparing And Contrasting The Ideas Of W.E.B. Du Bois And Booker T. Washington

623 words - 3 pages Two great leaders of the black community in the late 19th and 20th century were W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington. These men offer different strategies for dealing with the problems of poverty and discrimination facing Black Americans. Booker T. Washington?s gradualism stance gives him wide spread appeal among both blacks and whites, although W.E.B. Du Bois has the upper hand when it comes to his philosophy in dealing with economic

Comparing and Contrasting the Ideolodies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B Du Bois

1204 words - 5 pages William Edward Burghard Du Bois and Booker Taliaferro Washington were both civil rights leaders of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Du Bois was born as a freeman in Massachusetts, he studied at Harvard University and became the first African American to earn a doctorate from Harvard. . Washington was born as a slave in Virginia, he worked in the salt mines while attending school, and later attended the Hampton Institute to learn trade

Analysis of the Appalachian Culture in the Late Nineteenth Century

1059 words - 4 pages ). In this paper, we will dig more deeply in the rich Appalachian culture that existed in the late nineteenth to early twentieth century. We will focus on variety of interesting Appalachian cultural aspects such as music, dance and food. Before we ponder in the exquisite Appalachian cultural practices and beliefs, let us know more about its geographic region. “Appalachia is a 205,000-square-mile region that follows the spine of the Appalachian

Compare and contrast of the 18th and 19th century in America: econ/social/polit

670 words - 3 pages for automobiles and other mass-produced items fed consumer need to spend money in the oil century. But items like radios and television sets created new waves of social standards and political campaigns never seen in the coal century. Political campaigns of the coal century involved speaking tours that reached minimal amounts of people and concentrated on the use of political machines. This political system sustained itself throughout the coal

This essay compares the views of booker t washington and DU bois

542 words - 2 pages used for very important purposes. Like tracking cancer rates by community and location, the prevention of hepatitis B in Asian communities, the analyzing of data that doctor have that white women have breast cancer at higher rates and the illnesses that outbreak in different groups. Over all the healthcare organizations strongly oppose Proposition 54. This proposition will prevent the healthcare organizations to collect information that will come

Compare and contrast the way t

3223 words - 13 pages Compare and Contrast the way in which the media has handled the Falklands War and the Gulf War."You can win the battle but lose the war if you don't handle the story right." General Colin Powell in a speech to the National Defence University, 1990. Both the Gulf War and the Falklands War were extremely different not only in how they were fought but also how the media covered them. In this paper there will be an examination of how the

Compare and contrast America’s “Manifest Destiny” of the mid-19th century with its “Imperialism” of the late 19th century

1301 words - 6 pages Imperialism era could be compared to this example easily. An article was made during the late 1800’s, when the Spanish-American war was almost ending, and it was entitled Shall Cuba be Taken for Christ. This article basically personified the idea that if America were to take Cuba under their wing after the war is over, that they should send missionaries to the island and spread the word of Christianity through the ‘uncivilized’ island and teach the

Similar Essays

Andrew Carnegie, Eugene V. Debs, And Horatio Alger

557 words - 2 pages Andrew Carnegie, Eugene V. Debs, and Horatio Alger During the late nineteenth century rapid industrialization paved the way for extreme economical wealth of many business. In accordance with the overflowing wealth in the nineteenth century many individuals held similar but yet contrasting views toward the wealth that was created in the United States. Among these individuals were Andrew Carnegie, Eugene V. Debs, and Horatio Alger. One of

Booker T. Washington And The Negro's Place In American Society

2150 words - 9 pages undeniable value to the community in which he lived..." (Washington, 92)."Two distinguished leaders of the black community in the late 19th and 20th century were W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington. However, they sharply disagreed on policies for black social and fiscal progress. Their conflicting philosophies can be found in much of today's debate over how to end class and racial injustice." (The Two Nations Of Black America)Through Booker T

The Gospel Of Wealth, By Andrew Carnegie

1151 words - 5 pages In the “Gospel of wealth”, Andrew Carnegie argues that it is the duty of the wealthy entrepreneur who has amassed a great fortune during their lifetime, to give back to those less fortunate. Greed and selfishness may force some readers to see these arguments as preposterous; however, greed is a key ingredient in successful competition. It forces competitors to perform at a higher level than their peers in hopes of obtaining more money and

The Life Of Booker T. Washington

2863 words - 11 pages      During his lifetime, Booker T. Washington was a national leader for the betterment of African Americans in the post-Reconstruction South. He advocated for economic and industrial improvement of Blacks while accommodating Whites on voting rights and social equality. Washington traces his life from his being born a slave to an educator. His writings and speeches, though initially was very influential for his race, later in his life began to