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Comparing The Anti Utopias Of Essay

653 words - 3 pages

Both Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and Geroge Orwell's 1984 present to the reader anti-utopian societies; societies which, when taken at face value, seem perfect, but really are deeply flawed. Both authors wrote their books because they felt that the world was on a course to disaster and they wanted changes to be made before a society resembling the ones that they wrote about was made into reality. I will now take those two societies and attempt to point out their differences. One of the most striking differences between the two worlds is the amount of technology that is present in each one. Brave New World's society relies heavily on technology. It is an integral part of life there. Without it, babies would not be born, people would not accept the lives that were assigned to them and life could not go on. In fact, the cornerstone of the Brave New World is a technological revelation that has drastically changed out lives today - Henry Ford's assembly line. 1984's society uses technology, such as telescreens and food dispensers, but could conceivably exist without it. This difference in levels of technological advancements most likely stems from Huxley's great love for science. Another difference between the novels lies within the methods in which the government seeks to control the people. Brave New World takes a person at birth and inbreeds within them an uncontrollable need to follow society doctrine while 1984 uses fear of death as the method of control. The societies use completely different methods to control emotion within the populace. Brave New World surrounds its inhabitants with luxury and satisfies their every desire. When a person's desires cannot be satisfies, the government urges them to use drugs that make them forget what they desired in the first...

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