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Comparing The Attitudes Demonstrated Between Pre War And At War With Brooke's Poem The Soldier And Owen's Poem Dulce Et Decorum Est

1362 words - 5 pages

Comparing the Attitudes Demonstrated between Pre-War and at War with Brooke's Poem The Soldier and Owen's Poem Dulce et Decorum est

Dulce et Decorum Est was written at war in 1917 by an English poet and
World War I soldier Wilfred Owen. Dulce et decorum est is written in a
very bitter manner, by a man who had very strong anti-war sentiments.
The 27-line poem, written loosely in iambic pentameter is told from
the eyes of Wilfred Owen.

The opening line of this poem contains two similes which compares the
soldiers to beggars and hags ‘bent double, like old beggars under
sacks’, ‘coughing like hags.’ This is not how we would portray young,
fit, soldiers, but the fact of the matter is that they are no longer
fit, they are no longer keen and they barely remain soldiers. War has
aged and deteriorated them so much so that they are now compared to
hags and beggars. Showing us that war is neither ‘sweet’ nor
‘decorous’ (Dulce et Decorum). Owen continues his description of the
solders with the lines
‘All went lame; all blind’, ‘Drunk with fatigue; deaf’ further
describing their disabilities and to the extent at which war has
effected them.

The onomatopoeia of ‘hoots’ and ‘dropped’ is an attempt to capture the
sound of the 5.9 Calibre shells, with them hooting over head and
dropping behind. The description of the five-nines, ‘tired, out
striped’ shows us that they are no longer intimidating, even though
they are dangerously life threatening. In the second stanza the poem
begins its description of the gas attacks which is the central topic
and the most described, because it is such a terrifying and the most
horrific way to die.

The pace of the poem increases with the outburst of warning “Gas! Gas!
Quick boys!” which shows the urgency of the situation and the fact
that the soldiers only have a few seconds perhaps to put their masks
on. Owen uses the word boys which reminds us of their youth, but
having already described them as aged and disabled we come to the fact
that their youth was stolen, and we are also confronted with the
concept that they are innocent victims within the war. “But someone
still was yelling out and stumbling” this is the line where Owen
begins his vivid description of a gas attack death. It is introducing
us to the situation this soldier is in from a third person view. The
next line; “And flound’ring like a man in fire of lime” describes the
helplessness of this poor soldier who is about to die. The image of
the man "guttering, choking, drowning" permeates Owen’s thoughts and
dreams, forcing him to live this grotesque nightmare over and over
again.

The word ‘Dim’ in the next line has a lot of significance and meaning.
Firstly it describes the scene, the light, giving it an eerie and
gloomy feel, one with little hope. Secondly, it describes the chances
...

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