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Comparing The Nature Of Terror In The Gothic Novels, Bram Stoker's Dracula And Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

702 words - 3 pages

The two Gothic novels, Dracula and Frankenstein, introduced two of the most terrifying characters throughout all of literature. Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula, and Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, both present elements of terror and create a tense mood and a gruesome picture. In both of these novels the other characters are not able to see these evil creatures actions. Although both of these novels depict truly evil minds, Dracula is far more terrifying than Frankenstein due in part to its bloodthirsty vampires, mysterious deaths, and dark gothic tone. Dracula is indeed the more bone-chilling story of the two.
Although Frankenstein is quite a frightening adventure, the monster doesn’t create a scene quite like Count Dracula does. Victor Frankenstein, the monster’s creator, uses chemicals and his vast knowledge of science to create him. As opposed to Dracula, the characters that the monster kills die. Count Dracula’s victims are undead and roam the earth creating other monsters. With Dracula, the reader gets a sense that they might be the next victim. In Burt’s references, Senf’s opinion “ No other single piece of work, with the exception of the bible, has so influenced Anglo- American culture (Burt ¶ 1).” Frankenstein, first being published in 1818, made it a one of a kind for its time period. But when Dracula was published in 1897, it brought a whole other type of literature to the board. In this century, there was a fascination with Gothic horror fit in perfectly.
All throughout the Dracula, a feeling of failure and doom prevails because of his supernatural powers. Dracula attacks without warning, killing his victims and turning them into monsters like him, they are the undead. The victims don’t have a chance to fight or defend for themselves. Once chosen by Dracula, becoming one of him is inevitable. In this quote, Jonathan Harker states, “ When the count saw my face, his eyes blazed with a sort of demoniac fury, and he suddenly made a grab at my throat (Stoker 36)”. Here, one gets a sense of the true terror...

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