Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984

1346 words - 5 pages

Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984

Since the onset of the United States, Americans have always viewed the future in two ways; one, as the perfect society with a perfect government, or two, as a communistic hell where free will no longer exists and no one is happy. The novel 1984 by George Orwell is a combination of both theories. On the "bad" side, a communist state exists which is enforced with surveillance technology and loyal patriots. On the "good" side, however, everyone in the society who was born after the hostile takeover, which converted the once democratic government into a communist government, isn't angry about their life, nor do they wish to change any aspect of their life. For the few infidels who exist, it is a maddening existence, of constant work and brainwashing. George Orwell's novel was definitely different from the actual 1984, but how different were they?

They were different in 3 ways: government, society, and thought.1984 starts out with a so called "traitor to the party," Winston Smith, walking through the streets nervously observing the video cameras that are watching his every move. He makes his way into his apartment and produces a journal from his coat pocket. He thinks that even this simple act of attempting to keep track of time and history could get him vaporized. This scene portrays the strong grip the government has on its patrons. A person either obeys them, or is killed, or put into a forced labor camp. After Winston starts an illegal affair with a younger woman he gets careless and "the party" finds out that he has committed what they call "thought crimes". A thought crime is the intent to do something illegal but not actually doing it. In Winston's world a thought crime is just as severe as a physical crime. They arrest him and his girlfriend and torture them until they realize what they did was wrong and that they love "the party" and will never do anything to hurt it again.The two governmental systems were different in a very major way. The actual government of England in 1984 was a democracy. This democracy's foundation was made up of a parliament and a prime minister. Most other nations of the time had the same set up.

In Orwell's novel an oligarchic state existed. Airstrip One, which is the area we call England, was home to Winston and the central government of Oceania (a large nation consisting of North America, England, South Africa, and Australia). This central government had 4 sections. The "Ministry of Peace," the "Ministry of Love," the "Ministry of Truth," and the "Ministry of Plenty." Winston works in the "Ministry of Truth." The names of the ministries are misleading. They are opposites of what they appear to be. The "Ministry of Peace" declares war and tends to other such activities. The "Ministry of Love" is mainly a true description, but it does not promote love for people it promotes love for the "Party." It does this through torture and brainwashing. The...

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